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Our purpose is His pleasure

by | 12 April 2018, 11:27 AM

Do you regret something bad that you did or said recently? What would even make your list of “bad things?”

I don’t suppose our lists look the same – everyone holds themselves to different standards. There are obvious things like murder and adultery that we know are definitely wrong, but what about the convictions we must decide on for ourselves? 

  • Will I use vulgarities?
  • What’s my view on sex before marriage?
  • What kind of spouse will I be?
  • What’s my most important goal in life?

But we don’t really talk about such things anymore. In a world where anything goes, many of us aren’t absolutely sure about a lot of things or our decisions.

So we just go with the flow, we just let it be – not realising how dangerous that sort of spontaneity can be. But it costs to be careless about the way we handle our self, relationships, and money. And the most important, most costly decision we’ll make is in how we relate with God.

Our view of who God is and who we are to Him must dictate all of life’s decisions. The most important thing we can do for ourselves is to align our life and will to His (Romans 12:2).

  • If you’ve ever asked who the “real you” is – your Creator God has the answer (Psalm 139)
  • If you feel like you just don’t know what to do anymore – your Creator God has the answer (Psalm 86:11)
  • If you don’t know how to surrender your life to God – your Creator God has the answer (Matt 16:24-25)

When our desire is to be right with God, we are freed to know and follow Him. 

“So we make it our goal to please him… For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each of us may receive what is due us for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad.” (2 Corinthians 5:9-10)

Do you know what we’re born for? So many spend their lives chasing the wind. We make it our whole life’s goal to bring God pleasure.

Pleasing God is not the same as pleasing a superior at work, or blind subservience to a narcissistic control-freak. It is a winning strategy in the war against a real enemy who schemes against us.

Pleasing God delivers clarity to the decisions we make. The more we know and spend time with God and His Word, we more we will find out what pleases Him. After all, when we draw near to God, He will draw near to us (James 4:8).

Are you pleasing Him? It was said to the believers in Rome that those “in the flesh cannot please God” (Romans 8:8). The goal of pleasing God brings to light our sinful selves and all the ways we are naturally at odds with Him.

When our Lord and Master Jesus Christ said ‘Repent,’ he intended that the entire life of believers should be repentance.” (Martin Luther)

When was the last time we repented of doing something that wouldn’t please God? A life of repentance sounds like a hard and tedious one. But it’s a blessed life: Repentance takes the burden of sin off us (1 John 1:9) – a gift of grace that we might live free.

The things that please God are worth contending for. We can either gratify the desires of our flesh and live in careless disregard of who God is – or live in His forgiveness and love as pleasing sacrifices.

“To the person who pleases him, God gives wisdom, knowledge and happiness…” (Ecclesiastes 2:26a)

God desires to lavish wisdom, knowledge, peace, love, joy, and every other good thing upon us. As our Father, He does not want to withhold any good thing from us. If we align our will with His and desire to please God, our choices will reap rewards for our eternal souls.

We are accountable for every choices we make. At the end, we have to give an answer for the kind of life we lived and all the things we did.

Thank God for His mercy – that He would help us today by guiding us (John 16:13).

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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I just want to be a useful person

by | 12 April 2018, 11:23 AM

I had about 15 seconds to spare as I stood by my kitchen sink, waiting for my water bottle to fill up. It doesn’t take long for my mind to switch to its usual preoccupations. I was thinking of work.

Not the work I immediately had to do – 15 seconds wouldn’t be enough to sort that out! – but work in general. My job. My career.

In my wandering mind, I likened my life to a garden. There I saw an area overgrown with weeds – the corner of the garden marked out as “work”. The more I compared my career with others, the more the weeds of worry seemed to grow.

Their gardens seemed to be flourishing with fulsome, blooming varieties of financial security and career progression, while mine felt sad in comparison. I don’t even know how long my current job arrangement will last, and if I am cut out for the job.

When I looked at other gardens, I only saw how bad mine looked in comparison.

I came to realise that should I spend time comparing myself to others, I would neglect tending to what I had in my garden. Instead of thinking of ways to grow my skill sets, I would cease to take pride in my work. I lamented yet remained passive, and that nurtured a worrisome heart.

I thought that I might appear more successful if I had a full-time job instead of holding on to contract jobs. I thought that if I would be more fulfilled if I could have something more substantial on my resume – a “conventional” job arrangement so I don’t seem like a failure.

A worried heart is fertile soil for half-truths and flat-out lies. Whether waiting for my water bottle to fill up (or for the green man to appear on the traffic light), I found myself entertaining such thoughts over and over again.

“I don’t think God cares about what’s going on in my life. He’s too big for that.”

Even a quick examination of that accusation against God would have deflated the argument; but I wasn’t in the right frame of mind to do that. Somehow I found myself special enough that God would overlook me – just me.

“Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?” (Matthew 6:26)

Am I not of value to my heavenly Father? In response to such a magnificent truth, my grumbling and self-doubt had to give way to a careful evaluation of the way I was living. And then I realised that my main gripe wasn’t really about my job or what I was doing – but whether it all mattered to God.

What I realised, then, was that I had a responsibility to my job, whatever the title was and however long it was I was doing it for. I have a purpose, and it is to honour God with the work of my hands. This matters to Him.

The more I sought clarity on my goal – that He be glorified through me – and remembered His love for me, the less I doubted His heart towards me.

“And this is the confidence that we have toward him, that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us. And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him.” (1 John 5:14-15)

It may have been more practical to pray for a different job when I was feeling anxious about my future or career prospects. But I didn’t. Instead, I held on to a little prayer I had whispered under my breath more than one year ago.

Back then, I prayed that He would help me become a useful person – it was my moment with God most High and I knew that He heard me. I prayed that I’d be useful wherever I work. That prayer remains.

When I forget my value, He calls me to look at creation and rest in the knowledge that He is my Father and provider. And in that rest I find strength again to ask that He uses me – everything I offer – and makes me fit for every work that is set before me.

I just have to be faithful to tend to what is in my garden.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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In a world of choices, what is the one thing you seek?

by Jason Chua, Burning Hearts House of Prayer | 12 April 2018, 10:24 AM

As a “borderline millennial” born in the late 80s, I decided to ask my wife – a true millennial – about the way they think.

Our conversation flowed into the realm of “sense” and “purpose” and “reason for existence”, as she pointed me to the tip of the pyramid in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs where “self-actualisation” sat – the need to fulfil one’s purpose.

Many of our millennials were born into a world where their basic needs have been met, and that’s why they’re constantly in search of purpose.

In fact, I see these young people going from place to place in their pursuit of purpose; some are even willing to take on low-paying jobs because they find it worth the cost. And because of this sense of need for self-actualisation, they’re a little more free-spirited, adventurous and hungry.

I find that it is this characteristic of theirs that make them good candidates to become missionaries.😜 

TEACH THEM TO PRAY

In the past five years of leading young people and even in my own journey as a young person, I notice that we don’t tend to think of “young people” and “prayer” together. But I don’t think that young people find prayer unimportant – we know that it is fundamental to our faith and part of our connection to God.

Instead, I’ve come to realise that perhaps young people don’t pray or find prayer “boring” because they don’t know what to say.

In Luke 24, a time shortly after Jesus’ crucifixion, two disciples were on the road to Emmaus when Jesus Himself appeared and expounded the Scriptures to them. And it was only at the end when He broke the bread that their eyes were opened – though by then He disappeared from sight – and they said this to themselves: “Did not our hearts burn within us?” 

“Then their eyes were opened and they recognised him, and he disappeared from their sight. They asked each other, ‘Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?’” (Luke 24 31-32)

The “burning heart” experience is what happens when we interact with Scripture – with God’s Word – and allow it to create a spark within us and keep us burning.

He wants to put His desires into the hearts of men, which will fuel their hearts to fulfil what’s in His heart.

The key to set young people on fire for God are the very words in the Bible. These words aren’t just dry black letters on thin paper – there is a Man behind those words: He wants to put His desires into the hearts of men, which will fuel their hearts to fulfil what’s in His heart.

As we teach our young people to pray and respond to God’s Word in the Bible, they will grow in their depth of knowledge of God, their biblical language, and their capacity to pray and understand God. And the Holy Spirit will create a new world in them, just like how He formed the world in the days of creation.

If our young people don’t know how to pray, we must guide them into a life of prayer and as the Word forms in them, so will a spark be formed.

THEN SEND THEM OUT

I lead a praying community of young people and we have a prayer room that is inspired by the Moravians, who were known for their prayer and evangelism.

For over a hundred years, members of the Moravian Church in Germany started a round-the-clock prayer watch. At home and abroad, on land and sea, their intercession reached the Lord. And by 1791, 65 years after they began praying, the small Moravian community had sent 300 missionaries to the ends of the earth.

We have been discipling young people in the ways of prayer, getting them into a place where they have conversations with God, by praying with and through Scripture. The centrepiece of our prayer meetings is not issues we are facing but rather who Christ is. This has cultivated an environment where young people learn to pray.

They pray in their hearts, pray in small groups, pray in what we call “rapid-fire prayers” as they line up and pray for the nations that the Word of Jesus will be manifested around the world.

Their inward motivation is now to go to places where He is not worshipped, where He is not loved, where His name is not yet known.

And after spending four or five years coming to our prayer rooms, some of our young people have prayed so much that they don’t want to stay praying in a room but to take prayer out of it. I think they have begun to see a facet of Jesus’ world, that their inward motivation is now to go to places where He is not worshipped, where He is not loved, where His name is not yet known.

It’s in this place of prayer that God incubates His heart for the nations. And at Burning Hearts, we’re creating a type of greenhouse where young people can grow up in, with values and systems that will help them see Jesus’ worth in the midst of all these different things they face and experience.

Our prayer room is a space for young people to pray with Scripture, to stand before God, to look at His beauty, to meditate upon who He is and engage with Jesus and His Word. And it is our hope that they will one day say that Jesus is worth it all and give themselves to whatever He wants them to do.

MY HOPE FOR A GENERATION

We need to create an environment that emphasises values rather than forcing young people to a method. If we want them to move into a place of cross-cultural missions, the “ang-ku-kueh method”, where we simply put them into a mould, won’t work and they’re just going say that they are not interested.

But if we were to create a safe environment for them to grow – a greenhouse infused with biblical DNA – no matter where you transplant them to, their roots are going to remain and they can flourish where they are.

Our young people want to express the creativity and dreams within them, and we need to help them grow deep, healthy roots that will keep them anchored. Then they will be able to express themselves the way God has made them to be – in their true, original design.


Jason Chua will be speaking at The One Thing Gathering 2018, which will see hundreds of young adults unite with the International Houses of Prayer across the world to behold the majesty and beauty of Jesus.

Happening from July 19-21, 2018, for the first time in Asia, the gathering calls for young people who have purposed in their hearts to live with abandonment and devotion to Jesus, to do His work, be His voice and see His transformation in the nations.

To register your attendance, visit their page.

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Missions under 30: I’m a millennial and I’m not bored

by Claire Carter | 9 April 2018, 4:01 PM

I wonder how many people think that millennials are bored in church? Or unwilling to go on mission trips?

Think of us as spoilt or fragile, but don’t write us off just yet. I’m a millennial and I want to live for something bigger than myself – and I know I’m not alone in thinking this way.

Having grown up in the age of information and at a time such as this, where we’re constantly exposed to human brokenness and injustice, my generation actually holds more potential for sending out missionaries than ever before. 

As a millennial who has been going for mission trips since young and even organised them, perhaps I could share some perspectives on what millennials really want.

Once we are baptised in compassion and a love for the lost and the broken, it will start a fire that’s not easily quenched.

Firstly, I think we want to find our unique role in God’s redemptive mission. I believe we each have individual strengths, convictions, interests … And even our nationalities are uniquely designed for us to play a specific part of God’s building plan.

I think this predisposes us to seek out opportunities that are unique to us, in whatever areas we are placed in or feel in our hearts most strongly.

But the key is that we must have tasted and seen the goodness of God. We must find that He’s worth living for, and once we are baptised in compassion and a love for the lost and the broken, I think that will start a fire that’s not easily quenched.

If you find yourself in a capacity to influence and mould millennials, challenge them to a life sold out for Jesus. Help them rise up to that standard and see what that life looks like for themselves.

I know a friend who’s previously organised two mission trips to a village in Taiwan, where her grandmother is from. It is a village that has no churches and no Christians in the community. She sensed the urgency of the need and has led two separate teams to bring the Gospel to the children there.

You see, my friend has a unique ability to fulfil this specific call because of her ties to the land. As a member of the community, she’s accepted by them. Also, the circumstances she grew up in were pretty similar to the children, so they could identify with her story when she shared her testimony with them.

Maybe millennials do feel bored with pre-planned programmes that have been set up by churches or missions organisations, but it doesn’t mean that millennials are not mission-ready.

I think the Church would do well to encourage millennials to dig deeper and observe where God is placing us specifically and then provide the know-how and the guidance as we embark on these more unconventional forms of missions.

We want to take ownership of the Great Commission, too.

At my church, we have a global awareness team that sets up platforms to create awareness about stories from the ground to reflect what young people are doing to answer God’s call in our mission fields. These stories help us remember that we aren’t all that different and we can begin to do something where we’re at.

Whether it’s an overseas internship, an exchange or a gap year – we’ve heard stories about young people who have gone out to the nations to do something for God while still studying. People come back sharing these stories of how God has used them wherever they are.

Our platform of global awareness encourages young people not to see missions as a separate, compartmentalised part of their lives, but to see it as a lifestyle. And we can live out the Great Commission by using opportunities that are present within programmes we have in school, such as summer schools and overseas internship programmes.

Missions is exciting because God is exciting.

We want to mobilise this generation and the next because we have so many opportunities in front of us and it’s paramount that we see and remember God’s heart in all of these.

The antidote to short-lived excitement is to get us millennials closely acquainted with the person of God – the exciting character of God and His heart for His people. We must keep that fire burning.

If we make missions about a programme – we will come back from it seeing the power of the programme instead of the power of God. But missions is exciting because God is exciting. It is when we begin to feel and take on God’s heart for His people that we begin participating in something bigger than ourselves.

The greatest thing that you can do in life is be a part of God’s exciting mission to reconcile the world back to Him. And that’s the least boring thing in the world.


Only 21 years old, Claire Carter was the youngest panelist at the first GoForth Millennial Influencers Gathering, where she shared these thoughts on missions.

With an expected one billion people in Asia moving from rural to urban areas by the year 2030, the number of world city dwellers is expected to rise to 70% by 2050. There is an urgent call to the Church, especially as the majority of new urban dwellers will be young (under 25 years old) and live below the poverty line ($2 a day).

The GoForth National Missions Conference, happening June 21-23, 2018, will look at an array of diverse strategies to empower individuals and churches to reach and transform cities with the love of Christ. Visit their website to find out out more.

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Don’t just be a nice person

by | 28 March 2018, 2:08 AM

“Why would I do that for someone at my own cost?”

Suppose such a thought filled your mind one day: “What if I wrote a bunch of encouraging messages and gave it out to strangers?” Or you noticed that a classmate has been lagging behind in school and you wondered if you should offer him help. But you dismiss those thoughts quickly.

The things I’m talking about are things that require some semblance of sacrifice: Time, money, or a loss in “face”.

“Why would I do that?” is a practical question we might ask when we want to validate the spending of our resources on a person who didn’t ask us to help them, who might not appreciate us for what we do, or who might never be able to help us in return.

How would you answer the question, “Why would I?”

Would you say that it is the “right thing” to help other when we can? It is, after all, summed up in the Golden Rule, that we should “do unto others what we want others to do unto us.” (Luke 6:31)

For many of us, we might struggle with going the extra mile for others. Perhaps we have been taught by bad experiences that it doesn’t always pay to be nice – or feel restrained by a lack of time or energy. Or perhaps we are waiting for others to love us first.

What we want isn’t just to be a nice person, but to glorify God at the end of it all.

Yet it would be a waste if our struggle to love only ends in unwillingness or passivity. What if we would harness our struggles and let it challenge us to embrace the same attitude of humility and love that Jesus Christ had?

And if you find yourself in that place of “Why would I do that?” or “How could I do it?”, I hope you’ll find your answer in God’s enabling:

“…that our God may make you worthy of his calling and may fulfil every resolve for good and every work of faith by his power, so that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you, and you in him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.” (2 Thessalonians 1:11-12)

What we want isn’t just to be a nice person, but to glorify God at the end of it all.

Whenever you have a resolve for good – a desire to do good – that you find it hard to bring into fruition on your own, I pray that God will fulfil it in your life by His power, so that His name may be glorified through you.

And whenever you act in faith, I pray that God will complete your work with His power, that much is amounted to, so that His name may be glorified.

The next time you wonder, “Why would I do that?” and “How could I do it?” – consider these questions:

1. Will it glorify the name of God?
2. Will I ask for His grace and power to top up where I lack?

And as you serve and extend the love of God to others, forget not that you are also dearly loved by Father God, and you serve out of the desire to do what pleases your Father. If we will honour God – spending our life to serve God and His people (Galatians 5:14) – then God will also honour us (John 12:26).

As we count the cost of serving God, may we always arrive at the conclusion that we will gladly pay it, surrendering ourselves into the hands of our Lord Jesus Christ whose grace compels us to no longer live for ourselves (2 Corinthians 5:15).

So don’t just be a nice person – be His servant.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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I was born blind, but now I see

by | 12 March 2018, 2:44 PM

Was it just going to be another day at this lonely corner, trying to avoid the authorities and hoping to receive enough sympathy to fill my stomach for the next few hours?

These were the thoughts I would have every day, although I now wonder why I even bothered thinking about the same thing. It had been this way for years ever since my parents had passed away one after the other, leaving me to fend for myself.

I also used to wonder if life would have been easier if I had not been born with a visual impairment. And because my family was so poor, we could not afford medical treatment or therapy to ease me into daily life. In the end, for most of my childhood, I stayed home with my mother and help her with simple chores.

I never learnt what caused my blindness, but I’d heard passing remarks from the people at the market that my parents must have done something bad in their younger days. This made me feel sad – my parents were the best people I knew. They were not very educated, but they worked hard and loved me very much.

My mother used to tell me: Better to be born without sight than without a good heart – that is all you really need.

When they passed away and I realised I had no choice but to beg in the streets when the neighbours could no longer help me – we had no close relatives either – it was the lowest point of my life.

Every morning I would make my way down to a corner of a bustling part of my neighbourhood. If I was lucky, someone would be generous towards me and give me a few dollars. Sometimes, people even offered to buy me some food, maybe even sit and eat with me.

“Please help me.”
“Have some pity for the blind.”

I honestly believed then that this would be the rest of my life. Until that day.

Something had been going on lately. Something out of the ordinary. I never keep in touch with the news, but even sitting at my usual corner, I’d been overhearing several similar accounts of a blind man who saw again.

I never dared to allow myself to imagine what it would be like to see, but I couldn’t help but think: How was this possible? Could it happen for me?

I’d no longer be bound to these streets, no longer dependent on others’ pity on me. I’d be free. This thought scared me, because hope is a dangerous emotion.

But hearing that it could even happen for someone else awakened a curious faith in this blind man, a man in need of nothing less than a miracle.

As the days went on, more people – men, women and even their children – whispered and talked about this man who had healing powers. I knew it was the same mysterious man who’d brought back the sight of the blind.

“I heard that people asked him to have mercy on them … That’s how they got his attention.”
“He just asked if they believed that he was able to heal them – and then he did!”

Just believe? I couldn’t wrap my head around this. Who was this man and where could I find him? How long was he going to be in town? But I was also afraid – what if I did not have enough faith, what if I’d be the first one who couldn’t be healed?

Since young, my mother had told me not to believe in sorcerers or those who practised divination. Was this man one of them? But I’d suffered for so long in poverty and disability, I was sure she’d have understood why hope started to grow in my heart that I might meet him one day and be cured.

I did try to put all thoughts of being healed out of my mind, but the urgency that had been stirring inside took the better of me, and I found myself asking one of the strangers who stopped to talk more about this man who could heal.

She told me that the authorities were on alert because many people turned up to hear him speak – but that he was also of royal blood! I was scared to hear this but somehow comforted too. It couldn’t be so bad if this man had descended from a king, right?

From that day, I made up my mind that if he ever came my way – if God would allow our paths to cross – I would take my chances. Perhaps faith was growing in me by then.

I wanted to see. 

A week passed, then two, but my resolve didn’t waver.

And then the fateful day finally came. 

I began to hear his name chanted in the streets: “Jesus! It’s Jesus!” A mix of fear and courage arose in my heart all at once. This was my only chance! 

So I began to shout, “Son of David! Son of David!”

I yelled like a man who had no shame. If this man was who they said he was – the Messiah, the Chosen One – he wouldn’t look at me like those who believed my blindness was caused by sin in my family. 

The crowd that was with him was deafening, I couldn’t tell where he was in the midst of them – some even told me to be quiet – but I wasn’t about to just let him pass me by.

“Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

All of a sudden, I heard the movement around me stop. Then I heard someone call my name, saying, “It’s your lucky day, Bartimaeus! He’s calling you! Get up!”

Jesus had heard me. He had stopped for me and was calling for me!

I threw off my cloak and got on my feet, heart pounding, legs trembling. Kinds hands guided me to where he stood waiting. Then I heard him speak.

“What do you want me to do for you?” the Son of David asked.

I felt the power in his words coursing through me, as though the question was already an answer. Was this how the others felt when they heard Jesus call out to them? 

And before I could comprehend that moment, faith left my mouth: “Teacher, I want to see.”

At first he didn’t say anything in response, but I could somehow feel his gentle smile though my world remained dark. Then, these simple words. “Go, your faith has healed you.”

A bright light exploded all around me.

Colours, movement, faces … Everywhere. My heart was leaping inside my chest and tears were flowing down my dust-caked cheeks. For years I’d walked in a world of sightless sound and form I could only feel with my hands. Now everything I knew was bathed in a new light; this unfamiliar place I’d always called home.

My eyes rested on the one who had healed me – my Messiah, my Saviour. This man who stood before me with compassion in his eyes. In his presence I suddenly realised the depth of the blindness he had set me free from – a blindness that reached into the crevices of my soul.

I was a man in need of more mercy than I could ever comprehend.

“Lord, I will follow you all the days of my life,” I said as I wept.

And true to my word, that’s what I’ve done ever since.


This is an adapted account of blind Bartimaeus who receives his sight, taken from Mark 10:46-52.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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TWO NATURES

“So I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh. For the flesh desires what is contrary to the Spirit, and the Spirit what is contrary to the flesh. They are in conflict with each other, so that you are not to do whatever you want.” (Galatians 5:16-17)

The Bible shows us that there are two natures: One of the Spirit and one of the flesh. But we can only have one.  If we really want to see life transformation, we need more of the Spirit because what the flesh desires is contrary to what the Spirit desires. They are in conflict with each other.

“Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other.” (Galatians 5:26)

As vessels of God, what we need to do is flee the evil desires of the flesh and pursue righteousness, faith, love and peace. When we have more of God – there is less of ourselves. Where there is more of the Spirit – there is less of the flesh.

It’s one or the other.

SEALED AND DELIVERED

If we’ve received Jesus into our lives as our Lord and Saviour, the Bible says that we’ve received a seal of the promise of God.

“And who has also put his seal on us and given us his Spirit in our hearts as a guarantee.” (2 Corinthians 1:22)

But there’s another experience that God wants us to have in our Christian walk – it’s the baptism of the Holy Spirit. The Bible says that we will be filled – to the brim – with the Holy Spirit!

That’s not all there is to it. When we are filled with the Holy Spirit, though we may have changed, we are not removed from our usual environments that test our responses or reactions.

So we will react either according to our “old self” or respond through our “new self” which is being renewed in the knowledge of God. If we are not in step with the Spirit, it’s easy for us to respond in the flesh.

1. Anger
Whether you’re driving on the road or responding to your children: Are you aware of the situations and things that tend to draw anger out of you? Are you an angry person? Even though we are filled with the Holy Spirit, anger can seep into our lives through cracks and open windows of impatience and intolerance.

2. Self-righteousness
When you place white vinegar in a glass jar, it looks just like water. But vinegar stinks. We may look like water on the outside but we’re not.  We can do many Christian things yet still have a spirit of self-righteousness – trust and reliance on ourselves instead of the grace of God.

3. Jealousy
Things get nastier when you throw jealousy into the mix. Some of us get jealous when others do better than us: We write off others’ successes and we point fingers at them. We cannot stand not being the best. Don’t let jealousy make you a miserable person.

4. Other sinful desires  
Lastly, there are the darker things that we may not talk about openly – or at all. Things like adultery, pornography, stealing and backstabbing. These desires belong to our fleshly nature.

In order to keep in step with the Spirit and defeat our fleshly nature, we can’t just be filled with the Spirit one time. We need to continually be filled and continually be empowered so that God’s light won’t dull in us.

Think about the first thing you do in the morning. Do you reach for your smartphone or for the presence and guidance of the Holy Spirit? Each morning, tell the Holy Spirit, “Speak and I’ll listen. Lead and I’ll follow.”

Jesus said, “Let those who are thirsty come to me and drink, and out of your belly will come out an abundant flow of the Holy Spirit.” When we are continually filled with the Holy Spirit, not only are we filled – Jesus says we will be filled until we overflow!

By the continual empowerment of the Holy Spirit – through the overflow of our revived heart – we can bring revival everywhere we go: Our homes, schools, army camps, and workplaces.


This article was adapted from a sermon first preached on Jan 14, 2018, by Senior Pastor Jeffrey Chong of Hope Church Singapore.

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3 questions for the restless heart

by | 19 February 2018, 11:17 AM

“I just wanted to disappear. Specifically, I wanted to disappear to an isolated and desolate place that reflected how I felt inside.” said Holly Baxter, who spent five weeks along the Trans-Siberian Railway in Russia.

At some point, maybe you’ve thought of escaping, for real – to a place where there’s no need to keep up with appearances or show up for a job.

That’s one way of harmonising our feelings: Changing the external to match what’s happening on the inside.

Almost all of us would have experienced what it’s like to run a fever. And one of the most uncomfortable things then is having an icy-cold towel on your forehead when all you want to do is curl up in a thick blanket. It’s safe there – away from the attack of the chills and cold towels.

But what really needs to be changed is what’s happening on the inside.

Our anxious and restless running-away from our feverish heart reflect an absence of peace within, and not merely the difficulty from our challenges. Something’s off on in inside. And we would place a stethoscope our hearts, what will it say about the state of our souls?

Unfulfilled and conflicting desires are the cause of our unrest. When our desires get out of control, they become our worst enemy. Don’t let your desires pull you in all directions and keep you going nowhere.

These are 3 questions we can ask ourselves that might save our lives:

3 QUESTIONS TO QUENCH RESTLESSNESS

1. What kind of person should I be?

Take a moment to think about that question before you write an answer down. Spend some time with God on that question. It’s not an easy one because our answer necessitates changes, adjustments and sacrifices in our life.

Ask Him to give you a picture of the person you are to become. This vision will help to keep you going when the mission gets tough.

A vision will lead you. If God tells you to be more generous, you’ll know that the decisions you make in life must lead to more generosity. You may not always feel generous, but God will lead you to your destiny even — especially — when you don’t feel like it.

2. What am I living for?

If you don’t have an answer, then your thoughts and feelings — which are more prone to change than you may realise — will be your only guide.

That’s why it’s easy to do what feels good to us, to follow what everybody else is doing. It becomes natural to follow your heart. But the heart is deceitful (Jeremiah 17:9).

So what kind of person should I be? In fulfilling God’s destiny for your life, you must be careful not to squander and waste time on the temporal because every choice has its consequences.

3. What am I doing with my time?

Think about what’s frequently at our millennial fingertips these days: Instagram, Facebook, Netflix, YouTube and porn. Some are more innocuous than others, but most are still the well-worn holes we crawl into for worldly comfort when we need to escape.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.” (2 Corinthians 1:3-4)

But we have the God of all comfort on our side. Jesus offers to carry your burdens — the weary weights of this world. You must give them to Him because they are far too heavy for you. You were never made to do this alone.

Give God the best time of your day. Don’t wake up, and make the first action of your day a grasping for your phone in the darkness. Start your mornings on your knees. Have lunches with God. Time spent with God is time not wasted — never regretted.

BONUS: WHOM HAVE I IN HEAVEN BUT YOU?

” … And earth has nothing I desire besides you. My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.” That’s from Psalm 73.

When you can earnestly ask this question — and know the answer in your heart — something changes. Life may deal you all kinds of bad hands, but at the end of each broken day, you will still know you are loved and cared for by God.

Your flesh and heart may fail — you might miss the mark — but God will carry you through this heavenward journey.

Don’t let human weakness be your undoing. Refuse to end or label your story with failure. You have a God who has won it all, and He is your strength forever.


You can follow our “Calm My Raging Heart” playlist on Spotify.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Belinda Lee: My mother’s unwavering faith

by | 15 February 2018, 3:37 PM

As she recalled her mother’s final days in her 6-year-long battle with cancer, Belinda Lee took a moment to compose herself before she continued.

The former Mediacorp actress and host spoke of moments when her mom would get up in the middle of the night, when she was in great pain, to cry out to God.

“At that time, she was already on morphine and was very weak. I don’t know where she got the energy from, but she would shout with all her strength for God to take her home.”

“She would cry out with all her might like this: ‘Jehovah, I beg you to bring me home.’

“It was then that my family knew that she was ready to go home. It was painful for us to let her go but we knew that she was ready,” Belinda said.

It was the beginning of the end of a journey which saw her mother go from being anti-Christian to embracing the love of Jesus.

Said Belinda: “My mom, who told the whole world that she would never become a Christian, received Christ when I was in Bible college, and she actually got water baptised on her own without telling the family.

“To me, that shows how true her conviction was, because she willingly did it on her own without pressure from anyone – she did it on her own accord because she truly wants to know who this amazing God is, and she welcomed Him into her life.”

(Belinda Lee’s sharing on her mother’s faith begins at 40:44 in this video)

Belinda shared that her mother, who was illiterate, would pray for God to teach her how to read the Bible.

And He did.

“A miracle happened one day. She came to me beaming with joy, sharing that God answered her prayer and she could finally read the Bible! Not every word, but she was able to at least understand the gist of what she was reading.”

Belinda found it hard to believe, but was encouraged by a neighbour, who said the same prayer had come true for her own elderly parents. “She told me that I have too little faith in God!”

And the way her mother spent her last days stood out to Belinda.

“A week before she finally took her last breath, she instructed one of my aunties to cook a scrumptious breakfast to serve her friends, the members, and the pastors of the Chinese Church she was attending – because that was what she used to do when she was still mobile.”

Belinda recalls her mom saying this to her in Hokkien: “Belinda, I wasn’t educated and I’m not good at studying, but I know how to cook. With my gift, I hope that I can serve God and His children.

“My mom was a dying women, but while on her deathbed, she wasn’t thinking about her own needs or blaming God. All she was thinking about was how she could continue serving God and His people to the very end of her life.

“Mom did not fear death because she believed with all her heart that our Abba Father was going to welcome her with open arms and personally lead her through the white gates of heaven when she meets Him one day.”

“I was told I was doomed to fail”: Belinda Lee’s journey from insecurity to purpose

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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What if my family makes for an unhappy CNY?

by | 9 February 2018, 6:05 PM

Happy Chinese New Year! … Or is it?

Speaking to a number of people recently, I’ve realised that the festivities can be a difficult time for some. Not all’s well at family reunions, it increasingly appears to be.

Are you one of them? Are the relationships in your family breaking down faster than traditions can keep them together?

Maybe you once held out hope as a child, that things would get better in the family. Maybe you’ve tried, over the years, to get everyone together – but you no longer see a point to it when you’re the only one trying.

Maybe the relationships in your family are breaking down. Maybe you’re not even sure if there’s going to be a reunion dinner this year.

But what I do know is that it’s easy to feel like everyone else is having an amazing time when you’re scrolling through Instagram. It’s important to have perspective: We’re looking at the highlight reel of other people’s lives on social media.

Think about the things not present on Instagram: Strained relationships, family deaths, generational tensions, divorces, bitterness … The list goes on.

But I’m not interested in staying stuck in self-pity – we don’t have time for that. I want to think about how we can respond, if in reality, our family isn’t that perfect, shiny and colour-coordinated dream we see on-screen.

Love gets harder as we grow up – which only means our love needs growing up too.

British-Ethiopian poet, Lemn Sissay, was fostered from birth and abandoned at the age of 12. By 18, he had lived in four children’s homes. He illustrates the importance of family using the game of squash:

“Family are like the walls in a game of squash. You hit the ball and it comes back at strange angles and you try to get it again … It develops your muscles in strange places, because you have to stretch sometimes to get the ball back in to continue the game.”

You have to stretch sometimes. The stretch is the place where love is learnt. We begin young with the easier stuff: We shared our favourite biscuit with dad, or gave our favourite toy to our sister.

But love gets harder as we grow up – which only means our love needs growing up too!

It’s harder when love requires more from us, like when we’re faced with an aunt whom we just don’t want to tahan any longer. It’s hard when family culture seems impossible to change. It’s hard when money gets involved or when “face” gets in the way.

But when it’s hard that’s precisely when we need to persevere.

It’s not easy to be the first one in the family to say a loving word in response to toxicity or sarcasm. Unity is not easy. It’s not easy to put aside our pride and ask for forgiveness. And it’s not easy to choose to love when others don’t care.

If we give up on family, we never develop the “muscles” that we need. Sissay also says this:

“And that all that would happen throughout my life is that my muscles would waste away beneath me because I’m not using the muscles that develop in the game of family … Family is defined by how it deals with difficult issues. It is strengthened by how it resolves them and weakened when it tries to ignore them.”

So don’t be discouraged if your family is facing difficult issues. Consider what real love is to your family members. Be the one who would love them.

Why should you do it? 1 John 4:19. “We love because he first loved us.” Jesus Christ loved us to the point that He would die for us – all while we were still sinners. God’s love takes the initiative. Jesus did – so we must do the same.

If we give up on family, we never develop the “muscles” that we need.

We may not have gotten the love we needed from our family. We may even have even been disappointed by the very people who were supposed to be our best bets – but we always have a Father in Heaven who loves us perfectly.

“And I will be a father to you, and you shall be sons and daughters to me, says the Lord Almighty.” (2 Corinthians 6:18)

Being filled with our Father’s perfect love for us enables us to love those around us. If your family is challenging, then let it challenge you. That’s where the growth is at.

I pray you’ll have faith to see that your best days are ahead of you. I pray you’ll have hope in God to do what you cannot on your own, and I pray that you will love someone enough to step out of your comfort zone.


Screenshots were taken from our Chinese New Year initiative, “One More Rice Bowl“.

/ fiona@thir.st

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Life with the greatest showman I know

by | 8 February 2018, 5:21 PM

Over the last six weeks, The Greatest Showman, a film inspired by and loosely based on American showman P.T. Barnum and starring crowd-favourite Hugh Jackman has enjoyed longevity and popularity in box office sales since its premiere on Dec 28. From Feb 1, a sing-along version of the movie has also been made available.

Of course the critics are divided on the film’s historical accuracy, theatrics and scripting – it won’t please everyone – but the audience keep showing up.

I keep showing up.

I’ve seen the film three times in the last month and upon my third viewing, an abrupt sense of awareness made me lean further back into my seat when these lines were being sung:

“When the world becomes a fantasy
And you’re more than you could ever be
‘Cause you’re dreaming with your eyes wide open.”

Isn’t that life with God? Dreaming with our eyes wide open, now conscious of the world through God’s eyes? Our version of this “fantasy world” won’t all look the same, but it’d all constitute things that otherwise seem impossible or improbable in our current one.

“It wasn’t so long ago that you were mired in that old stagnant life of sin. You let the world, which doesn’t know the first thing about living, tell you how to live. You filled your lungs with polluted unbelief, and then exhaled disobedience. We all did it, all of us doing what we felt like doing, when we felt like doing it, all of us in the same boat.” (Ephesians 2:6)

With God, we are always more than we could ever be. He is the greatest showman – and He’s got a spectacular life waiting in the wings for all who give Him room to do His work.

If we would search deeper into the roots of our greatest pain and disappointments – it is that we are not enough. Or that we might never be.

“Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us.” (Ephesians 3:20)

But as I think about my world, now that the living God has redeemed it, my world is indeed a fantasy: What I could only previously dream of is now my reality.

There is no dream bigger than to have our sins forgiven and lives redeemed. It cannot be done by our strength, intellect or ability.

A life that’s given back to the Creator opens the door to a future where our best days are always ahead.

Sin alone stands as the biggest hindrance to a life of “more than we could ever ask or imagine” and the forgiveness of sin is found only in God.

For those who run to God, His power is at work within us. With God there is forgiveness and kindness that alters the way we spend eternity. There is a palpable excitement that reverberates from within a life that’s given back to the Creator. It opens the door to a future where our best days are always ahead.

And it carries us through the unspectacular moments in our brief existence on earth, as we’re on our way to becoming “more than who we could ever be”.

The possibility of more lies in the hands of a God who can do more than all we even dare ask or imagine of ourselves – and all for our good.

Whether it’s at the movies, in honest conversations with a friend about faith and life, a random song you hear on the radio, or in the darkest hours of the night when you struggle the most – I hope you always keep a door open for God to reach you.

When the lights come back on at the end of a movie, or whenever you have to “face reality” again, remember that there is a God-reality for your life that is wilder and infinitely more satisfying than even your best dreams for yourself.

The lasting sense of peace that you are searching for is not found on the other side of “making it in life” by your own merits and efforts. Your true satisfaction is found in coming alive in Jesus Christ, by the mercy and grace of God. It’s a reality we can step into.

So whatever stage you’re at, would you let Him show you the greatest version of your life?

“And you know you can’t go back again
To the world that you were living in
‘Cause you’re dreaming with your eyes wide open
So, come alive!”

/ fiona@thir.st

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Down the trail of punishing emotions

by | 29 January 2018, 4:17 PM

“Aiyo, so clumsy!”
“What can you do properly?”

I saw the wave of sadness and anger that was about to overcome him, and I recognised it. It was obvious that those words cut deeper than it should have. We could brush it off as bad parenting or poor management of emotions – but perhaps it reveals something bigger.

I recognised that boy’s emotions because I’ve been there. And perhaps you have, too.

When at the receiving end of comments that run the gamut from aggressive to unnecessary, we have only split seconds to decide how to respond. Perhaps it is much more comfortable for us to depress into a sulk or launch into a verbal war in our minds, than to calmly remind ourselves that our mistakes are not the sum total of our person.

But the actual mechanics are harder to sort out, especially when negativity already has a well-worn path to get to us. Perhaps that’s why some comments sting us so sharply even though we know they shouldn’t.

Things happen: You spilled a cup of coffee, you got drops of Laksa gravy on your shirt, or you broke a cup when washing it. They are small things – but these mishaps have the potential to reveal what’s on our inside.

It is much more comfortable for us to sulk or launch into a verbal war than to calmly remind ourselves that our mistakes are not the sum total of our person.

Some days, we may find enough confidence in ourselves to laugh or shrug it off. But on other days, it may feel like nothing we do is right and we’re the biggest failure we know; the mess on the kitchen floor is trivial compared to the mess that we think we are.

Even something as small as spilling a drink or messy eating can set us off and touch raw nerves in our complex circuitry, because it is no longer just about our carelessness or Mum’s loaded comments – what has been simmering in our belief system has also spilled over.

I remember moments when my emotions grew way out of proportion; it felt as if a switch was flipped, and the trigger didn’t matter anymore.

In those split seconds when we catch a glimpse of our boiling anger or experience a sudden, crude awareness of our own insecurity – do we surrender to our feelings? It might be comforting to relish in our anger or take comfort in our pity-parties, but the trail doesn’t end well in those places.

Are there punishing emotions and unpleasant accusations that seem to be parked at the door of your mind, always waiting for an opportunity to heap unworthiness on you? Are there words that seem to always get you down? Is there a particular trait about yourself that you are ashamed of?

In those split seconds when we catch a glimpse of our boiling anger or experience a sudden, crude awareness of our own insecurity – do we surrender to our feelings?

I will go out on a limb to say that the feeling of being trapped in our mistakes and inadequacies is neither new nor all that uncommon. We’re not all that different, really.

But there is a real path out of it.

There is a verse in the Bible that says this: “So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed.”

The sweet taste of freedom is best cherished by those who know that they have been in captivity. To the captive who has been slave to unwanted anger, bitterness, harshness and rage, the sweet taste of freedom is the experience of humility, gratefulness and peace.

There is a real way out of the the hole of darkness, anger, and bitterness – and there is no need for us to live in captivity any longer; the debt has been paid on our behalf.

If your heart is tired and bruised, take comfort and find rest in the love of Jesus Christ that is promised to all those who believe in Him. In His love, we don’t have to prove ourselves.

Would you consider inviting Jesus into your life?

If you’d like to invite Jesus into your life, pray the following prayer and believe it in your heart:

Dear Jesus,

I confess that I’m a sinner and I need your forgiveness. Today I invite you to come into my life to be my Lord and Saviour, help me to become the person I was created to be. Thank you for dying for me on the Cross, that I might have eternal life in You.

In your name I pray,
Amen.


If you’ve just said the prayer, we encourage you to find a church to root yourself in so that you can experience and enjoy the full Christian life. Please feel free to email us at hello@thir.st as we’d love to help you kickstart your journey of freedom in Christ.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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The missing ingredient in pleasure

by | 19 January 2018, 5:03 PM

The author was listening and responding to a sermon by Senior Pastor Jeffrey Chong of Hope Church Singapore.


“Most things promise more than they deliver.”

10:56am That is true. *Copies it down.*

“When it comes to satisfaction, we often feel like we’re always one step away; if only I had that job, a new phone, a girlfriend/boyfriend, more well-behaved children, or that dream home – then I will be satisfied.”

11:02am Ha – totally true. It never happens! It’s like a messy person going to IKEA to purchase that shelf that will finally keep the room in perfect order – it’s only a matter of time before the real problem is exposed. Having the dream job doesn’t absolve us from hard work, just as being someone’s partner is even more hard work. Will nothing satisfy us then?

“It’s like a dog chasing his own tail – the closer it gets, the further he is.”

11:05am He’s using this example again. But I think it’s perfect. I like dogs but I’d hate to be this dog. When will I learn to stop chasing after pointless things?

“Pleasures without joy is empty. If you feel a sense of restlessness in your spirit – it is because there is more than what pleasures in life can deliver. Life is short. Don’t waste it on hollow things – meaningless things.”

11:10am Meaningless … Are we still in search of meaning these days? But I get the lure of pleasure. When we’re on the other side, peering into the promises of pleasure, we just want to know how it feels like: Wealth promises power, fame promises an exciting life, sex promises love …

He was a king well known for his riches. He endeavoured to find out what people should do with their short time on earth; he was interested in the pleasures of this world and what it can accomplish.”

“Over time, King Solomon built houses, vineyards, took hundreds of concubines, indulged himself in every pleasure he could think of; he worked and gained fortune and treasures, and he was well-respected and did anything that he wanted.”

11:16am Let me guess … he had accomplished all these and he was still not joyful?

“There is probably no one more familiar with hollow things than King Solomon. He concluded, towards the end of his life, that everything is meaningless – all that he thought was good turned out to be hollow.”

11:18am Is there a bit of Solomon in all of us? Perhaps it’s hard for us to take his advice because we want to try it for ourselves too. But it won’t be for free. Our choices create a path, and it can lead to places we don’t want to go. The costs may be higher than what we first thought – just ask Solomon; He wasted his life only to realise that it was all for nothing.

Pleasure on its own is neither evil nor bad – it is a feeling – but is meaningless if we try to find fulfilment from it. Solomon recognised that anything he tried to do apart from God turned out to be meaningless.”

“Joy is found only in God.”

King Solomon made this observation: Some people have wealth, possessions and honour to the extent that they lack nothing that their hearts desire but they did not have the ability to enjoy them – the ability to enjoy whatever God gives to us. If God does not grant us the ability to enjoy things, it will all feel meaningless (Ecclesiastes 6:2).

If joy has been the elusive element that we have been searching for in our pursuit for pleasures, what’s left is for us to return to God because we can find our meaning only in our Maker who formed us and knows us.

At the end of our lives – will we say that it has all been meaningless? Or will we put an end to our chasing so we can rest in God’s joy? God’s arms are open to us, however we come to Him – as long as we come.

/ fiona@thir.st

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Reminder: Your self is due for an upgrade

by | 17 January 2018, 9:05 PM

Upgrading our houses isn’t a foreign concept, but what about ourselves? Our traits and bad habits which frustrate us and recur are like the troubled parts of a house in need of replacement or renovation.

But just thinking of the trouble “renovation” would bring often discourages us from fixing the “house”, until the painful disrepair and dysfunction of life finally outweigh the discomfort and inertia of making a change.

Many of us ultimately reach a point where we need to make life-saving changes that aren’t just cosmetic or quick fixes. Instead I’m talking about structural overhauls – demolishing and rebuilding.

YOU DON’T NEED PERMISSION TO IMPROVE

Think back to the times you found weaknesses in your “house”.

Perhaps you realised how bad you are at apologising, or that you argue incessantly with your loved ones because fighting is easier than saying how you really feel. Maybe you finally saw how loud your inadequacies voice themselves through a petty word hurled in hurtful retaliation. 

These discoveries about ourselves happen whether we are 15, in our 30s or middle-aged. They should happen as we walk and commune with God, who then reveals our impurities and refines us for His glory.

“And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.” (2 Corinthians 3:18)

So we should never stop growing as people just because we’re “old enough”, have proper jobs and should know how to “adult”. There isn’t an age for perfection because we’ll never “arrive” on this side of eternity. In that vein of things the door to our “house” must remain open for God’s repairs and renovations. 

When we treat ourselves like a rental house, we hold back on the most important renovations.

So it’s worthwhile to pause and consider today, wherever in life we’re at: Do we treat ourselves like a rental house or a real home?

If you take ownership – responsibility – of the house, this is probably how you live: I’m going to give these walls a new coat of paint. I’m spending the money to replace the cracked beams. And I’m replacing the entire foundations of the house because I’m building something bigger.

These are things you don’t do if you live in a rental house because (1) You’ll need permission from the owner to do these things and (2) Why would you spend the time and effort on a place that doesn’t belong to you?

When we treat ourselves like a rental house, we don’t live as we should. We hold back on the most important renovations. I’d like to think that it is kinder and wiser to treat ourselves like a real home – one we have responsibility for.

YOU ARE WORTH THE WORK

Is there something or someone holding you back from living a changed life that would honour God? Say this aloud: “I will do whatever it takes to fulfil God’s purpose for my life.”

That was all the permission you need. Sign off on the permits to build and rebuild, and hand that piece of paper to God. To knock down walls and demolish shaky foundations – that’s a work of rebuilding only the very best carpenter can do (Mark 6:3).

And sure, some renovations are more complex than others. Some won’t be easy, they’ll be inconvenient and messy … But it’ll be worth it.

With God on our side the renovations He makes will produce life. We’ll see victory over addictions and bad habits. He’ll rip out unhealthy thought patterns and ungodly beliefs – and replace them with new life (Ezekiel 36:26)!

We’ve all been created wonderfully, we’re just not yet who we’re meant to be.

As long as we’re alive, we haven’t missed the train for change. If you feel trapped by your age, or fear what you think people think of you … Just remember that you don’t need their permission to step into your destiny. Take the permission back from whoever you’ve given it to – and give it to God.

You’re not an accident – your blueprints have been drawn up by a perfect God. We’ve all been created wonderfully, we’re just not yet who we’re meant to be. And there’s beauty in that.

There’s excitement in that. Our Lord, who is both carpenter and king is waiting for the work to begin! He is not daunted by the disrepair. No, He’s looking forward to the restoration.

I’m leaving you with a quote from CS Lewis. I think he gets it, and I hope you will too:

“Imagine yourself as a living house. God comes in to rebuild that house. At first, perhaps, you can understand what He is doing. He is getting the drains right and stopping the leaks in the roof and so on: you knew that those jobs needed doing and so you are not surprised.

But presently he starts knocking the house about in a way that hurts abominably and does not seem to make sense. What on earth is He up to? The explanation is that He is building quite a different house from the one you thought of — throwing out a new wing here, putting on an extra floor there, running up towers, making courtyards. You thought you were going to be made into a decent little cottage: but He is building a palace.

He intends to come and live in it Himself.”

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Facing the giants in your life

by Senior Pastor Benny Ho, Faith Community Church | 4 January 2018, 8:20 PM

The late Ann Landers who ran the popular Agony Aunt column in the US used to receive some 60,000 letters a month. She revealed: “One problem dominates. People are afraid.” People are afraid of losing their health, wealth, and job. They are afraid of the future, being left alone, rejected and embarrassed. They are afraid of death, and even of public speaking.

While some fears are constructive, most fears paralyse and render us ineffective. Throughout scripture, we are told not to be afraid. Jesus often said “Fear not!” and we are reassured in 2 Timothy 1:7 that “God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind.”

So why do we still have fears?

We are afraid because at the root of our fears is the fact that we find ourselves unable to fully trust God. Fear and the lack of trust go hand in hand.

However, every instance of fear is also an opportunity to trust in God and move from fear to courage.

In 1 Samuel 17, we read the familiar story of David versus Goliath. Picture this: The Israelites and the Philistines are at war in the Valley of Elah. The Israelites are on one hill, and the Philistines on another, with a valley in the middle.

Here comes Goliath, nine and a half feet tall, a giant of a man with a bronze helmet on his head, a suit of armour on his body, a javelin slung on his back – a massive 200 pounds in all.

He stands like an overgrown tree and shouts in a deep voice: “Why do you come out and line up for battle? Choose a man and have him come down to me. If he is able to fight and kill me, we will become your subjects; but if I overcome him and kill him, you will become our subjects and serve us. This day, I defy the ranks of Israel!”

Goliath did not just taunt the Israelites once but, like a broken record, he did that again and again for 40 days non-stop! All the Israelites were terrified and gripped by fear.

One of the most powerful weapons that the devil uses against us is intimidation. And I’d like to give you five keys to help you overcome our fears:

5 KEYS TO FACING YOUR GIANTS

1. Guard your eyes – watch what you are looking at

The first principle in overcoming fear is to watch what you are focusing on. Are you focusing on God or your circumstances? Fear comes from focusing on our circumstances rather than on God.

“But you, Lord, are a shield around me, my glory, the One who lifts my head high.” (Psalm 3:3)

“I will not fear though tens of thousands assail me on every side.” (Psalm 3:6)

2. Guard your ears – be careful who you listen to

The moment Eliab, David’s oldest brother, heard him, he said to David, “Why have you come down here? And with whom did you leave those few sheep in the desert?” (1 Samuel 17:28)

But David demonstrated that he was a giant inside. He turned away from Eliab’s discouragement and continued to pursue God’s glory. David did not allow any discouragement to dilute his courage and passion for the Lord.

If you listen to the wrong people, you will exchange your faith for their fear.

3. Guard your mind – remember the right thing

“But David said to Saul: “… When a lion or bear came and carried off a sheep from the flock, I went after it, struck it and rescued the sheep from its mouth…this uncircumcised Philistine will be like one of them because he defiled the armies of the living God. The Lord who delivered me from the paw of the lion and the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of the Philistine.” (1 Samuel 17:34-37)

To overcome fear, you must fill your mind with the powerful things that God has done in your life. David remembered how God was with him in the past, and it filled him with confidence. 

4. Guard your heart – be confident with God’s provision

When fear threatens to strike, remember to

1. Do what you know
2. Use what God has put in your hand
3. Stick to faithful old sling and stone

David wrote, “When I am afraid, I will trust in you. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I will not be afraid. What can mortal man do to me?” (Psalms 56:3-4)

5. Guard your back – cut off the root of your fear

It is not enough to immobilise our giants or knock them out temporarily. We must literally cut them off from our lives. And there is only one way to put an end to crippling gear – by applying the truth of the God’s resurrection to our lives.

The truth is, all of us have “Goliaths” in our lives and experience challenges that intimidate us. There are fears that haunt, accuse, and make us feel miserable and diffident. These fears rob us of courage and cause us to live in a constant state of fear.

However in Christ, we do not need to be afraid. We are no longer bound in fear, but in the security of our King of Kings and our Lord of Lords. He is our victory, courage and confidence.


To find out more about how you can “Manage Your Emotions – Overcoming Negative Emotions for a Life of Abundance”, visit Benny Ho’s resource page.

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How will you spend yourself this year?

by | 3 January 2018, 8:56 PM

If you haven’t heard it enough, welcome to 2018. I hope it’s been a good first few days for you.

There’s a fixed “budget” when it comes to days: We have only 365 each year. And we don’t get to “save” them up – they get spent no matter what.

So given that we have to spend our days, we should hope to get a good return on our investment. Annie Dillard puts it this way, “How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.”

This was in my year-end reflections: How much of what I do is out of self-interest, with no regard for others? And am I hard-hearted towards the poor?

“Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.” (Hebrews 13:16)

This year, will we dare to ask ourselves these questions and answer them honestly, in order that we might become people who please God?

In the Bible, a group of religious people was asked to consider those same questions when they wanted to know why life wasn’t turning out the way they wanted to, even though they seemed to be doing everything right: They fasted, they asked God what they should do, and even seemed eager for God to come near them.

But in their preoccupation with rituals and self-gain, they could not see their hypocrisy and hard-heartedness towards the poor. They asked to be satisfied by God, but they withheld help and kindness from others.

Our call then is to stop blaming victims, stop gossiping about other people’s sins, stop condemning others, lend a hand instead of finding fault, put ourselves in the shoes of others and meet them where they are – love them.

It calls us to consider the commandment that carries as much weight as loving God: Loving our neighbour as ourselves. It is as true for us today as it was for them. When we ask to draw near to God, should we not also draw ourselves near to those whom He is near: The broken-hearted (Psalm 34:18).

But loving our neighbour requires the giving of ourselves – “Spend yourselves,” the Bible instructs.

“Do away with the yoke of oppression, with the pointing finger and malicious talk. Spend yourselves in behalf of the hungry and satisfy the needs of the oppressed.” (Isaiah 58:9-10)

We need to spend time in order to hear about a person’s day when no one else will, we need to be present when a lonely heart needs someone most, and we need empathy to see and understand the invisible hurt that has been inflicted upon the person in front of us.

“There are plenty of charities and soup kitchens there and people can get fed every half an hour. But such a charity model fosters a one-way relationship and a taking mentality.We believe that people’s hurt and brokenness occurs in the context of relationships and often their families, and so healing and transformation will also come in the context of relationships – healthy ones.”
(Craig Greenfield, founder of Alongsiders International)

Who knows if we will also receive healing and experience transformation through our willingness to step out in willing and confident obedience to God?

If we would yield our individuality to God, lay down our ideas and judgement of what people deserve or do not deserve, and simply do what He says, this is what He promises: “The Lord will guide you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land and will strengthen your frame. You will be like a well-watered garden, like a spring whose waters never fail.” (Isaiah 58:11)

Don’t we want this to be a picture of our inner lives? God keeps His promises, so we can be sure that spending our days doing justice and loving mercy will yield the best return on investment.

What we have – it all comes from God. With God’s help, we can use what He has placed in our lives and in our hands so that the glory goes back to God.

“Your people will rebuild the ancient ruins and will raise up the age-old foundations; you will be called Repairer of Broken Walls, Restorer of Streets with Dwellings.” (Isaiah 58:12)

Walls signify protection and dignity. But our city is surrounded by broken walls – do you see them? Think about the brokenness all around us: In homes, hearts, marriages and all types of relationships.

Is there anyone around us who needs protection? Is there anyone around us who needs dignity restored to them?

This is our year to stop with the gossip, turn away from condemnation, rest our pointing finger for good – and give of ourselves to those who need a healing touch, a helping hand, or even just a word of encouragement.

We’d be mistaken to think that the brokenness all around our city has nothing to do with us. The walls are broken, but God Himself is our Repairer and Restorer.

The God we serve? He is able to bring dead things to life and call into existence things that do not exist (Romans 4:17).  If we answer the call to – with His help – be a repairer and restorer wherever we go, God will guide us and satisfy all our needs. It’s a promise. Trust Him.❤️

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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“I never learned how to turn this exhausting pain into bliss”: The silent struggles of Kim Jonghyun

by | 20 December 2017, 11:27 AM

On late Monday afternoon, the lead singer of popular Korean boy band SHINee, Kim Jonghyun, 27, was found dead in his rental apartment in an upmarket corner of Seoul.

From the time he sent his final farewell to his sister to the moment the police broke in to discover him unconscious from carbon monoxide poisoning – it all unraveled in less than two hours.

By dinnertime, the K-pop fandom was shaken by the unbelievable news that one of their beloved idols, with his perfect smile and hair, and lovable personality to boot – had very likely taken his own life. SHINee was due to celebrate their 10th year anniversary since their debut, and Jonghyun had been preparing to release solo music in the new year.

As I read the translated last words of a stranger – a heartbreaking letter given to a close friend some time before he’d actually acted on his suicidal thoughts – my heart ached; it stirred and birthed a strange sense of loss in me – strange because I didn’t know who he was.

“I am damaged from the inside. The depression that has been slowly eating away at me has completely swallowed me, and I couldn’t win over it … I wanted someone to notice, but no one noticed … Things you can overcome don’t scar you for life … It’s a miracle I lasted this far … I never learned how to turn this exhausting pain into bliss.” (Jonghyun’s letter)

My sense of loss grew as I paused to think about those who are fighting the same battles that Jonghyun did. It could be anyone I know – any other smiling, happy face on Instagram. The private battles against depressive feelings, an overwhelming sense of inferiority, exhausting pain and a sense that one’s failings are final – are far from exclusive to international pop-stars.

And in the face of suffering and pain that is as real as darkness, how do we find the right words to say that would cut through the thickness of anguish? And how do we heal an illness if we don’t quite understand it ourselves?

But even as we sometimes rage against the futility of words and our inability to rescue those in misery, we must fight the real enemy: The lie that there is no way out.

We’ll never know if the next person we speak to is going through a similar, unspoken battle. In light of the fragile times we live in, kindness is a risk we should always take – so we can make it easier for someone to believe that they are loved.

“Everyone in the world is loved by at least one person.” It’s one of those random “facts of life” that float around on the Internet, and I was gripped by it when I saw it, because at that point I had been looking for any evidence to suggest that I was indeed loved.

I felt a deep need for that “fact” to be true. It felt as though I had been wrapped with layers of insulating material that was preventing me from being able to feel love at all. Like the nerve ending that was meant to feel love had died a long time ago.

Kindness is a risk we should always take – so we can make it easier for someone to believe that they are loved.

Someone then told me, later, that what we want most in life is simply to love and be loved. And it didn’t take long for me to find those words true and sobering. If we would condense the expanse of the suffering, drama, monotony, labour, and mystery of life; it is this: We were created to love and be loved.

“But what if I’m not loved?” I suspect that this fear is far more prevalent and havoc-wreaking than we could realise, than we could care to admit. Perhaps we feel that being “unloved” disqualifies us from having worth. But we must remember to look at the first three words –“we were created” – and realise that God has a purpose for each of us and each of us is more loved than we can ever imagine.

And if we’re willing to try it, sometimes the fastest way to burst the insulating bubble that prevents us from feeling love is to take the first step to love someone: Encourage a friend you seldom talk to, compliment a co-worker, help a stranger in need.

When journalist and author Howard Sounes peered beneath the famous lives of six artistes who led troubled lives that ended in suicide – among them Amy Winehouse, Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix – he uncovered the dark side of the music business, along with the fragility of the most successful artistes of their time.

Sounes found that most of the artistes had terribly difficult childhoods. “All of the wealth and status they achieved was not enough to undo the impact of their early days,” he said. 

Perhaps there is something about an artist’s fame and/or extraordinary talent that causes us to confer them hero-status, view them as superhuman, or less human – and fail to consider that humanity consumes them as much as us, with flaws, insecurities, and a drive for acceptance and love.

We know from their experiences that it is not popularity, success or wealth that will rescue us from despair. And this is not limited to only troubled artists. If we are honest with ourselves, we all have things that we wish to undo – something that happened in the past or something about ourselves that we wish to change.

The “rest” that God gives feels a lot like freedom – the freedom to live, love and grow to become who were meant to be.

“Things you can overcome don’t scar you for life.” But the truth is, overcoming on our own is difficult, maybe near impossible when it comes to certain deep wounds no human could possibly reach. And like Jonghyun, we may never learn “how to turn this exhausting pain into bliss”.

 “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” (Matthew 11:28)

When I first read these words that were inscribed on a building in my primary school, I had to ask someone what “weary and burdened” meant. With the passage of time, I soon understood what it felt like to be weary and laden with a weight that I couldn’t quite carry on my own.

But as I came to Christ, I also grew to experience the rest that God promised in that verse, and in many other verses such as John 16:33.

 “I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33)

The “rest” that God gives feels a lot like freedom – the freedom to live, love and grow to become who we were meant to be. The freedom of overcoming with Him and through Him.

“Peace is a promise He keeps” were the words of a song that moved me to tears. If you are looking for lasting peace, would you consider going to the Promise-Keeper? God invites us to go on life’s journey with Him because only He knows the way home; and we’ll need all the rest for our souls that only He can give.


If you know anyone in distress or contemplating suicide, call the SOS hotline at 1800 221 4444, or email pat@sos.org.sg

You can also seek help at the following numbers:
Singapore Association for Mental Health: 1800 283 7019
Institute of Mental Health’s Mobile Crisis Service: 6389 2222
Care Corner Counselling Centre (Mandarin): 1800 353 5800
Tinkle Friend: 1800 274 4788

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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A life for a life: You are now free

by | 19 December 2017, 11:01 PM

“What will happen if I cause someone’s death on the road?” The new driver thought to herself.

She came up with this list in a split second: Jail time, a criminal record, shame and regret.

Thought of the costly and embarrassing consequences caused her to sit up and slow down, becoming even more aware of the cars and pedestrians around her.

By then, she had latched onto the thought of a permanent blemish – a wrong that cannot be reversed, a criminal record that will be held to her name for as long as she lived. And it frustrated her.

“It feels all so permanent. One mistake – and that’s it. There is just no way to undo something that did happen, right?”

This time, she was referring to the human conscience.

“What can a person do to undo the weight of a guilty conscience?”

At this point, she was thinking about all the wrongs a person could commit – a lie, a bad thought, selfishness, malice – the range of weights of guilt that could weigh on a person, without a trace or mark visible to another person.

She’d read before that Oswald Chambers puts it this way: “Conscience is that ability within me that attaches itself to the highest standard I know.”

“So what is the highest standard you know?”

This made her remember an exchange between a mother and her son:

“Some men call it conscience, but I prefer to call it the voice of God in the soul of man. If you listen and obey it, it will speak clearer and clearer, and always guide you right; but if you turn a deaf ear or disobey, then it will fade out little by little, and leave you in the dark without a guide.

“Your life, my son, depends on heeding that little voice.’”

It implied that the highest standard is one held by God, one we should attach ourselves to.

“But why would we attach ourselves to God’s standard if it is so high?”

No wonder the Bible puts it this way: “For all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.” We may choose not to heed God’s standard, but it doesn’t make change the fact that His is the highest standard.

“No one can meet such a standard! It’s a setup for failure!”

Sin is anything that falls short of God’s standard, and it is so whether or not we choose to subscribe to His standard. If I think that stealing is not a crime, it doesn’t cease to be a crime. And when we commit a crime, we are punished according to the law and convicted by a judge. When we sin, likewise, there are consequences.

“Is sin therefore like a crime according to God’s standards?”

You could say so. Because of the destructive nature of sin, death is the punishment for sin. We are aware of death, aren’t we? When young, we ask this question: Where do people go after they die? I think that we ask that in our innocence because we feel it in our hearts that people are not meant to die.

“But people do die. We all will die. That’s a fact.”

Death is only a fact because sin is real. It was not the natural order of things, that’s why death affects us the way it does. No matter how good or bad a person is by our standards – death comes, because we have all done wrong.

Sin is as real as death – but forgiveness is also as real as life.

Though death for all is our present reality, the Bible also says this about God: “But with you there is forgiveness, so that we can, with reverence, serve you.”

Sin is as real as death – but forgiveness is also as real as life. When God forgives sin, the result is life as it was meant to be – eternal. Life for all – is God’s original design for our world.

When God made us, He designed for us to be with Him forever. Don’t mistake eternal death and eternal life for fable because they are both real.

“If God forgives us – then why doesn’t everyone automatically have eternal life?”

Think of forgiveness as a gift. God offers forgiveness from sins, as a gift unto us, but we have to go to Him in order to receive the gift.

“That’s easier said than done. How do we go to God?” 

Do you know what kind of people return to God?

“Those who know that they have sinned?”

The sinner knows that his punishment should have been death, but because of God’s mercy, he does not receive death.

In order that God may forgive us for our sins, our sins had to be atoned and paid for – the criminal does not get to walk free because he pays for his crime.

When it comes to sin, no other forms of atonement but death would suffice: A life for a life, blood for blood.

That was the reason why Jesus Christ, God’s one and only Son, had to die on our behalf – so that we may be forgiven. Because of Jesus’ death and on the cross, we can go to God to receive forgiveness for our sins.

When Jesus rose to life again three days after his death, God demonstrated His resurrection power. Because Jesus Christ lives, so can we, and we will cross from death into eternal life – and not eternal death as we originally deserved.
That was my journey to make sense of punishment, death, sin, wrong-doing, love and forgiveness. It began long before I even understood the gravity of my grappling.

As children, we asked adults where people went after they died. I can’t remember if any adult told me that they went to a better place, and I don’t know if they believed it to be true.

I had a knowledge of my wrong-doing; I made mistakes that left me unsure who I had to go to for forgiveness. Who could forgive me if the wrong I had done wasn’t against them? Why did I have the sense that I did wrong?

I had no knowledge of what sin was, or who God was, but my conscience knew – it didn’t matter how trivial the offence seemed to be, because no sin is trivial.

Even as I seemed to have stumbled upon the Truth of Jesus Christ by chance, I knew that it was not by my mere stumbling that I should be given a chance to come into the promise of eternal life.

The grace of God paved the way for me to even begin to understand the mystery of God’s love and forgiveness for me, through Jesus Christ. The gifts of Father God we cannot buy nor do without.

But we can receive it.

“Jesus answered, ‘I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.'” (John 14:6)

This is the message of Christmas, the birth of Jesus Christ: Come to me, acknowledge me as your Lord and Saviour, receive forgiveness, and I will set you free – forever.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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You never know who you’re bringing to Christmas service this year

by | 13 December 2017, 2:05 PM

Ever so often we look back on our decisions – good ones, bad ones, and those that fall undecidedly in between.

Whenever Christmas time draws near, I am reminded of a decision that my friend made about eight years ago in December.

On Christmas Eve, my friend Christina visited a Church for the first time.

While I would have liked to have been that friend who gave her a warm invitation to come to Church, I was actually the cowardly one who didn’t dare to ask her to come to church – even for Christmas.

Maybe I was worried she wouldn’t like it, that her INFJ personality couldn’t take it. What if Church was fun for just me? I’d visited a Church for the first time two years before she ever did. I had always wondered what Church was like, I’d returned after the first week, and then the next …

It was through an illustrated song presentation during Easter that I heard the Gospel for the first time and realised that there was a big possibility that God is real and He wanted to know me – and so I’d raised my hand in that service and welcomed Him into my heart.

At that time, I didn’t know what changes having Jesus Christ live in me would’ve brought into my life. I didn’t even know how long I was going to be a Christian for … but I tried anyway.

Perhaps I was hesitant to invite Christina – my classmate then – to Church because she knew all my bad habits: I slept in Chinese class, copied answers on my homework and skipped classes!

I wasn’t the best student around, and I certainly wasn’t a good Christian. So I didn’t see why she would want to go to Church with me. She seemed to be doing just fine.

“What do you mean I didn’t invite you?”
“I thought we were just going to the mall.”
“Oh …”

After all these years, I had forgotten that I never really invited Christina to Church that Christmas. I had merely asked her if she would like to go to the mall the next day – which happened to be Christmas Eve.

But I remember those moments I had in class when I was wracking my brains on how to ask her to come to Church with me – and all the while she was sitting just beside me!

Yet, my guilt would drown out what little faith I had: “Aiyah, you like that, still dare to ask people to go to Church?”

My doubts were louder, and they were winning the internal battle, but urgency finally broke through when it dawned on me that Christina and I weren’t going to be classmates anymore after the year ended. I might not – might never – get another chance to bring her to Church.

It’s funny to think about now, but when the question finally escaped my lips, I found myself casually asking her to the mall instead – Suntec City, to be exact – where my Church was having our Christmas services that year. I just couldn’t say the word “Church”, as if it was taboo.

Yeah, that was me. Time was running out but I was still cowardly.

Before I tell you what happened next with Christina, there’s something I must share: As a new Christian, one of the first few things I learnt how to do was pray.

“Prayer is just talking to God, like you’re talking to a friend.”

I’m not sure how seriously I took it, but there was one night in my young Christian life when prayer was the only thing I could turn to.

I didn’t kneel on the floor by my bed or clasp my hands together, but I prayed. I opened my laptop and I typed furious prayers – like I was talking to a friend –  in a text document.

Perhaps that itself was the miracle – that I was able to sleep, that I went to sleep knowing that I wasn’t alone.

My tears were falling and my fingers were hitting the keys faster than I could think. I knew that there was no one else but God who could calm the situation that was happening outside the door of my room.

That night, I didn’t hear an audible voice from God telling me that He’s real (I might have prayed for this), nor did I feel anything miraculous. To be honest, I cannot remember what happened next.

But perhaps that itself was the miracle – that I was able to sleep, that I went to sleep knowing that I wasn’t alone.

I didn’t realise how significant that night was to me then.

“It was something about hope that the pastor quoted from the book of Romans.”

Eight years after the mall invitation, I asked Christina about her decision to accept Christ that unexpected Christmas Eve. And this was one of the verses that first caught her attention:

“And hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.” (Romans 5:5)

And it humbled me at the moment, again.

Had Christina been searching for hope that whole time?

I was so caught up with what Christina would think about going to Church that I forgot to consider that perhaps my friend and classmate – as have-it-together as she may have seemed on the outside – might also have those nights, as I did. Nights when she felt all alone and in desperate need of a divine intervention.

How would she have been able to do that if she didn’t know God for herself?

I’m so glad that God made a way for Christina to encounter Him that day, that she didn’t walk away when she found out about my plan to bring her to Church (“Oh look, it’s a Church service in Suntec City! Let’s go in!”) and that He spoke into her heart right when she needed to hear Him most.

If I hadn’t received Jesus Christ into my life, I wouldn’t have known that there was Someone I could turn to. And if I hadn’t persisted in asking God to show Himself real to me, and if God had let me go my own way – I wouldn’t be where I am today.

As I look back on my decisions now, I know I made the best one on April 7, 2007, when I received Jesus Christ as my Lord and Saviour.

I’m sure Christina would agree that it was her best decision too, when she made it on December 24, 2009.

As for my decision not to invite her to Church earlier and more directly? Well, I can do better with the next person!

So this year, to save me from tears, I will muster up the courage to make good decisions – to invite someone to Church for Christmas, so that perhaps once again, I’d have even more reason to celebrate when they too are born again.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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A shot of wonder for the weary

by | 12 December 2017, 4:12 PM

Last Sunday morning, I settled into my usual seat in Church – fourth row from the front – strongly feeling the lack of an additional hour of sleep, all for this predictable 90 minutes of service.

That day was just like any other week – we didn’t have a special programme, there were no guest speakers … It was a feeling that seemed to mirror my life at present: A clear routine of places to be at and things to do, nothing out of the ordinary. The sea of my life felt neither stormy nor terribly still, at least for now.

Some days, I wished that it could be more exciting, that I could dream up more things into existence; on other days, I would’ve been happy with just more sleep. It wasn’t the Sunday service, really. Life was just sian.

My Senior Pastor, Jeff Chong, was preaching that morning. I found myself surprised by what he was saying, “Many of us in lead fast paced lives, and we can so easily go on autopilot.”

My eyes widened and I might have sat up a little straighter.

At the back of my mind, I reviewed my past weeks and even months and realised that it was true.

I WONDER, WHERE’S MY WONDER?

While I might not have entirely been on autopilot, I realised that wonder had been leaking from of my system, and leaking even faster because I’d been dealing with a bout of flu that just wouldn’t go away.

The more tired I got, the more grouchy and dissatisfied I become. The busier I became, the more I lost the bounce in my step.

And I missed my sense of wonder. I had been so well-acquainted with it just a few months ago, when I relied on it daily – it was like fuel to me.

Wonder is a feeling of amazement and admiration, caused by something beautiful, remarkable, or unfamiliar.

But as it is with all fuel, it needs to be replenished, again and again – for as long as you want to keep going. Even – especially – when things are going well, we have to watch the indicator on the tank.

There are so many things in our lives that pick at our sense of wonder – a discouraged heart cannot possibly dance and a soul bogged down by comparison is not free.

Wonder is a feeling of amazement and admiration, caused by something beautiful, remarkable, or unfamiliar.

So even if our routines are familiar or drab, it doesn’t mean we cannot find beauty in it; it doesn’t mean that it cannot be remarkable.

HAVE YOU EVER SEEN THE WONDER?

I think that the one who can find beauty in anything will never be disappointed. I believe that beauty is everywhere – in everything  – because God is everywhere.

I also think that God brings beauty everywhere because of His expertise at bringing good out of bad. But we need a trained eye to see that, especially when it is still dark.

In the dimmest of situations, God’s presence is enough to flood a soul with eternal hope, and His hope creates endless streams of amazement and admiration – wonder!

“The world is larger and more beautiful than my little struggle.” 
(Ravi Zacharias, Recapture the Wonder)

Are you in a situation that is draining the good stuff out of your system and causing you to lose hope? Perhaps your life is more stormy than still, at present. If something doesn’t look good – at home, in your health, finance-wise, or in one of your relationships  – would you consider committing it to God who is able to work good out of bad?

Ask God to come into your situation and do what only He can do.

God can see far beyond what we can, and He knows the most strategic move for us to take – even if it doesn’t make sense now.

A long time ago, Paul and Silas were thrown into prison in Philippi (where northern Greece is today). God could have kept them out of prison, but because they were in prison, their jailer got to experience the miracle of God and became a believer (Acts 16).

Before that happened, another man was thrown into an even more dire situation: Jesus Christ was about to be crucified on a cross. It was the most terrible punishment for a man to endure, yet God allowed it, because He knew that it was only by Jesus’ death on the cross that the world may be saved (Matthew 27).

God can see far beyond what we can, and He knows the most strategic move for us to take – even if it doesn’t make sense now – so that He work out good from the bad.

“As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today.” (Genesis 50:20)

It may not be what we expect, sometimes it might even take a long time – but God is trustworthy.

Even in familiar routines, in the otherwise unspectacular humdrum, same-ness of life as we know it now – the presence of God alone makes all the difference.

When you’re in need, stoke the fire of wonder, think of what God has done and can do for you.

I see the world in light
I see the world in wonder
I see the world in life
Bursting in living colour
I see the world Your way
And I’m walking in the light
(Wonder, Hillsong United)

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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The most important plot twist of all time

by | 6 December 2017, 4:44 PM

“In His time. In His time. He makes all things beautiful. In His time.”

I sang the lyrics, word by word, as a prefect helped us follow the song with a pen on the well-used transparency.

In my Primary school, we used to sing songs about Him almost every day after recess – but was He real? To me, He was possibly another famous person or deity – an ang moh one – that people worshipped, not too unlike the ones I had on altars at home.

But I sang those nice-sounding and comforting songs anyway.

His name – Jesus Christ – would invariably involve talk of His death, how He loves me, and that He died for me.

I used to wonder: What does that even mean? Why did this man die for me?

I would only realise much later that there’s a peculiar reason why the death of Jesus Christ translates into profound hope – even, and especially, in the darkest of days – for all who believe in Him.

There is hope – because even though His death on the cross felt like a plan gone wrong, it was all part of God’s Plan A. 

WHERE IT ALL WENT DOWNHILL

From AD26 to 36, almost 2,000 years ago, a man named Pontius Pilate served as the Roman Governor of Judea, a province where modern Israel is today.

The chief Jewish priests at that time brought before him a charge against Jesus, a Jewish man, for claiming to be the Messiah – the Chosen One, the Christ – whom the Jews believed would deliver mankind from sin and back to right-standing with God.

Pilate was convinced that Jesus was innocent of any crime that warranted death, but he also knew that the respected chief priests were enraged and wanted Jesus dead because they didn’t believe that Jesus was who He claimed to be.

The politician saw an opportunity to save Jesus in the upcoming Passover: By the goodwill of the law, the Roman Governor was allowed to release one Jewish criminal before the festival, so he gave the people the choice to release Jesus Christ – whom he had found to be innocent – or Barabbas, a well-known prisoner and murderer at that time (Luke 23:19).

Jesus had to die to overcome death, and come back to life so that love could prevail forever.

The crowd was insistent on having Jesus crucified (Luke 23:23), so they chose to set Barabbas free (Luke 23:25). If you were there watching this unfold, you might be thinking: What?!

But here’s the first zinger in the great plot twist: Jesus already knew that all these would happen.

More than once, Jesus told the people closest to Him – His disciples – that He had to go to Jerusalem to “suffer many things” at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law (Matthew 16:21); He will be killed and then raised again three days later.

Imagine their shock when they heard that Jesus would soon die as punishment. One of His disciples, Peter, said to Him: “Never, Lord! This shall never happen to you!” (Matthew 16:22)

Peter’s response was insubordinate but understandable. After all, Jesus –whom Peter believed to be the Messiah who would save the world – just said that He was about to be killed. How was that saving the world?

Wouldn’t that simply be … game over?

THE PLOT TWIST WAS THE PLAN

Death is our greatest opponent in the natural world. The weakness of our flesh and our running out of time are themes central to humanity as we know it – and I think the saddest thing about death is that it comes against love.

Losing my mother used to top my list of fears. I used to wonder if I could survive – in every sense of the word – without her. What would I do without her? Who would be the voice of reason that shouts at and invades my insensibility?

Perhaps Peter was raging against the same sense of loss; He was about to lose Jesus, the one whom he believed has come to save the world.

For all the confusion and shock that the news of Jesus’s impending death caused Peter, there was a greater plan that Jesus wanted his disciples to understand – there was more to what their eyes could see and their minds could fathom. There is always more.

Frederick Buechner Quote: “Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don’t be afraid.”

Jesus would overcome the world – through death and resurrection. He had to die to overcome death, and come back to life so that love could prevail forever.

So if there’s only one legitimate reason why we shouldn’t be afraid, it is this: I can trust the guy who overcame death out of His love for me.

Since His finished work on the Cross, Jesus Christ is still very much in the business of dethroning death and peddling peace in the midst of our human chaos. He instructs us to be strong and take heart even though we will have trouble in this present life.

“I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33)

It’s not instinctive, especially if we look at the state of affairs today. But dark nights cannot come against real Hope that has a plan.

CONTROL IN THE MIDST OF CHAOS

We can learn from Peter’s exchange with Jesus that everything was always under control – right down to the part where He had to die.

Even when things seem to have all gone south for Jesus, it was all part of the divine plan from the start.

And that’s the great plot twist that turned the course of human history around: Jesus had to suffer and die at the hands of evil men – and that was how He saved the world.

This is my challenge for us: Fiddle with the buttons, change the frequency and get in tune with God’s higher reality.

Suffering and evil don’t contradict God’s plans or chip away at His ability to work for our good (Romans 8:28). No matter what life may throw at us today or tomorrow – He is with us today in our sorrows and He will come for us again with eternal joy.

As we live painfully aware of both the beautiful and terrible things that are happening in our individual and collective worlds, this is my challenge for us: Fiddle with the buttons, change the frequency and get in tune with God’s higher reality.

The rejoicing Christian life (Philippians 4:4) is not a call to be blind to present suffering, but to remember Jesus’ promises to us, and to believe in Him.

Don’t be afraid. Take heart, and rejoice – His great plot twists are always just around the corner.

“In His time. In His time. He makes all things beautiful. In His time.”

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Children of divorce, how will we win the fight?

by | 30 November 2017, 2:43 PM

“She’s okay what. Look at her. Does she not look okay?”

When my parents’ divorce was finalised and the relatives were informed, I was a topic of discussion at the lunch table.

Not fully knowing the weight I was trying to carry on my own, I smiled back in agreement with them – because I wanted to be okay too.

At that time, I don’t think anyone in the family was familiar enough with the rough terrain of divorce to help me navigate it.

It was easier for us to talk about my results, which secondary school I should go to – talk around the elephant in the room – instead of discussing how I should process my emotions or think about my new “broken” family.

I wanted to defend the decision made by my parents by proving that I was fine and that they shouldn’t be blamed. I was trying to be my own grown-up, but I was really just an anxious child trying to scare off the monsters by standing on shaky stilts, hiding in clothes too big for me.
So how bad is the effect of divorce on the children? Can young children still “turn out well” after their parents’ marriage ends? Do children of divorce fare worse academically or relationally?

For a long time I was interested in the answers to those questions too. I wanted to know if I’ll be “okay”. I can’t actually remember if my parents ever told me that I was gonna be okay. Maybe they didn’t, because they weren’t sure of it themselves too.

As a kid then, I was oddly “okay” with my parents’ divorce. And I saw it coming. I don’t recall asking them to stay together, since I was also of the view that that they shouldn’t – they weren’t happy together anyway. My young self believed wholeheartedly that it was “for the better”.

Then, I realised that all these questions and perspectives about divorce reveal a more concerning problem: Are we missing the mark on the significance of marriage? Can divorce really be “for the better” if we can be assured that the children will be fine?

The effects of divorce tend to show up in other areas – a weak sense of self, a broken view on love and divorce, an inability to trust fully.

What I didn’t know was that no matter how “okay” I was with it, the trauma will be no less significant. What I knew as home was disintegrating into fragments – the divide between my parents was a chasm opening inside of me, beyond my line of sight.

For children of divorce, the changes we experience are neither just situational nor superficial – they’re deeply real. And their effects may not show up all the time in our grades, a CT scan, or in our social functioning.

The divorce couldn’t change my biological-belonging to my parents, so I now had two separate realities that I didn’t want to have to deal with. But on the inside, I wanted a do-over – a restart, please – a different life altogether.

You see, the effects of divorce tend to show up in other areas – a weak sense of self, a broken view on love and divorce, an inability to trust fully …

At least, that was my experience.

As an only child, I wanted an older sister. It was almost purely so I wouldn’t have to go through my parents’ divorce alone, so that it didn’t feel like it was little me against the world.

I didn’t want to be defenceless; I felt attacked every time someone talked about either one of my parents – I felt lacking because I didn’t have a dad and mum who were referred to as a pair, a team – and that meant neither was I part of something whole.

I needed someone else I could turn to in the fallout of my nuclear family. I would’ve asked my older sister what was happening to us – and how do we make sense of it?

The divorce was an event set into motion by signatures on sheets of paper. But the breaking apart of something that was once joined will always entail a great shattering and pieces to be picked up.

In my own growing up by trial and error, in my fearful picking-up-of-pieces, I realised that I wanted a sibling because I was really looking for perspective, and for direction. With the permanent loss of my parents as one entity, it meant that I no longer had a safe place – and I was lost.

It was obvious what was happening on the outside – my parents no longer wanted to be together. But on the inside, there was an upheaval that couldn’t be resolved with a simple pair of signatures.

I didn’t feel the full force of my parents’ divorce in me until much later, when I went through my first major break-up.

“We are searching for a sense of home, a way to convince ourselves the lies in our abandonment and loneliness won’t have the last word.” (Paul Maxwell, To the sons and daughters of divorce)

The words of Paul Maxwell provided the language I needed to explain to myself what I’d been struggling with all these years; I was searching for a sense of home.

But my blooming identity crisis meant that I was in no position to see things clearly. I didn’t know who I was or what I even wanted.

I thought that maybe if I tried hard enough, if I looked for the “right” person, my new home – my new belonging as found in a person – would be indestructible, unlike the one I had.

But at the same time, I admittedly picked at my relationship like the big bad wolf who tried to blow the house down, because I needed to see if it would hold up.

I was in constant confusion. My destructive thoughts, feelings and actions should have been a big warning sign to stop what I was doing – “DO NOT PROCEED” – but I was so close to finally having a sense of home that I couldn’t bear it.

Eventually, the house was blown down like one made of straw.

As I picked up the pieces of my own break-up, I could strangely see myself better. Maybe I was growing into the clothes once too big for me, maybe I was getting better at seeing things from a mature standpoint, with no more need for stilts.

In the familiar wake of heartbreak, I realised that the source of my struggles came mostly from my sense of self. It might sound funny but my deepest question over the years was ,”Who am I, really?”

As a prideful child who only knew how to speak the language of “I’m okay and I’ve got it all together”, I didn’t know how to ask for help. Perhaps at several important junctures of my life, I should’ve raise my hand, the way we were taught to at zebra crossings, so that someone could see me – and all my confusion – clearly.

But that wasn’t in any school syllabus – so it took me more than a decade before I got hold of some language to help me express and process my parents’ divorce.

We don’t have to live our whole lives crippled, even if our growth was somehow stunted in our childhood.

Psychologist Erik Erikson sees the development of a person in stages, and success at each stage helps the person better take on the challenges in the next. He believes that the basic conflict in adolescence (12-18 years old) lies between identity and role confusion. If a child is confused about his identity, it leads to a “weak sense of self”.

Since the development is cumulative, a weak development (e.g. sense of self, independence, or competence) in earlier stages may mean a reduced ability to do well in further stages, when one has to build intimacy for committed relationships.

But it doesn’t mean that it cannot be made up for.

It means that we don’t have to live our whole lives crippled, even if our growth was somehow stunted in our childhood. The pain of our parents’ divorce is real, and it’s not the kind of pain you can easily heal with a just-get-over-it band-aid.

But it’s possible.

One night this year, I took out my big old reel of painful memories and played it in my mind again. It was extensive. I wondered if there was anything I could do about it, but I didn’t see how it was possible unless there was a way to undo the past. How does one fix a marriage that was supposed to last a lifetime?

This was a routine I was well-accustomed to: Holding onto my pain, keeping it in a box and opening it once in a while to remind myself of why I am the way I am. It was an equal mix of self-loathing and self-pity – downright scary.

But that night, I was asked if I was going to keep doing this for the rest of my life.

And the one with the question was none other than God, again.

Even though I’d allowed Jesus into my life somewhere in my teenage years, I hadn’t let go of my past. I was still old on the inside, while trying to be new on the outside. No wonder I kept walking down old paths of pain.

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here!” (2 Corinthians 5:17)

Christ offers a new life to anyone who would believe in Him. A new life that is not weighed down by the consequences of choices – others or mine – made in the past.

How should I put it? It’s not self-help at all, it was help from God Himself, with all the power that only He brings, so that I could trade in my old life for a new one. It was Him who saw me clearly all this while, even when I didn’t know how to raise my hand.

Though I did try, there was nothing I could do to help myself other than gratefully placing my life into the safe hands of a God who loves me.

So that night, instead of telling Him all the reasons why I thought my life sucks and how it wasn’t possible that I could live any differently, I quietened down and listened to His love for me.

I still had one thing to resolve about divorce: My acceptance of it.

Many years ago, somewhere near Christmas time, a couple from the same Church as me shared their story of adultery, forgiveness and reconciliation.

Sitting in the audience, listening to their story, I thought that it was crazy. Their story did not end in divorce! And I remember thinking that I’d never be able to find enough strength in myself to forgive that way.

And it made me realise that all this while, I believed in divorce as a solution.

To me, marriage was nothing beautiful, at least not for long; marriage only meant that there was a chance for something precious to be taken away from me. So even though I searched for love, I was incredibly fearful of it.

“Why would people vow to love each other for the rest of their lives? Why would anyone think they could keep a promise like that?” 

These were just some of the questions I had towards marriage as an institution in our world. It befuddled me that despite the many failures of it, marriage is still popular, that people would still choose to enter into a contract with rising dissolution rates.

But I had to also ask myself which view of marriage I was subscribing to: Was it biblical or practical?

I had to orient myself with the biblical view of marriage – designed by God to reflect the way He loves us. 

With that in mind, the wild vows of marriage make sense to me now, because I know that God keeps those same vows toward me. In His eyes, it is not so much a contract as it is a covenant. And He keeps His covenant of love perfectly.

Sometime this year, God reminded me of that couple’s story and my response to it all those years ago.

The wild vows of marriage make sense to me now, because I know that God keeps those same vows toward me. In His eyes, it is not so much a contract as it is a covenant.

A sudden question confronted me that afternoon: Should I come face-to-face with adultery in my marriage one day, would I stay put in the marriage instead of choosing a divorce?

My response was equally sudden. My heart lunged out, almost surprising me, a yes in agreement with my mind.

Holding onto love as a covenant – the highest of all promises – that’s the kind of bewildering love that Christ first showed us and now calls us to:

“Love is patient, love is kind. It does not dishonour others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” (1 Corinthians 13)

Impractical? Maybe. But definitely biblical. And the sort of love I’d want in on.

And that became the day the child who was “okay” with her parents’ divorce renounced divorce as an option or solution in her own life – come what may.

I knew that my answer was significant. Should I one day make a decision to attempt to love another person in marriage, I know that my future no longer rests in the history of relationships in my family.

Honestly, it doesn’t matter whether I’d eventually be married or not. The far more precious lesson I’ve learnt is that God’s love will never fail me. And that is my confidence.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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“Stop window-shopping, it’s time to pay the price”: Will you be the one?

by Thir.st | 23 November 2017, 6:25 PM

He was speaking to a crowd of over 800 young people from more than 80 churches – gathered in an auditorium on a Thursday afternoon at the FOPx conference for youths – but there was someone specific Pastor Tan Seow How was looking for and speaking to.

“I’m not speaking to the 800 of you. I came here to preach to the one man, one woman who is God-ready. Ready to pay the price of surrender. Ready to rise up to change the world.”

Affectionately known at Heart of God Church as Pastor How, he reminded the congregation of something God said to Adam in Genesis 3:9, where He asked: “Where are you?”

“God isn’t really asking where we are. Don’t you think He knows?” said Pastor How. It wasn’t a matter of physical location. God’s question to Adam was one about willingness of heart – was Adam’s heart in the right place, and would he come to God? Where are you spiritually? Are you present? Are you ready?

And the reply He is looking for is: “Here I am! Send me!”

“Perhaps there are only 2, 5 or even just 10 in our midst,” he said, acknowledging that not everyone was going to be respond that way.

Some things look good from afar, but when you go closer and realise the cost, will you still commit to it?

“It’s like window shopping,” said Pastor How. “You see something that you like in the store and it looks good. So what’s the next thing that you do? You reach for the item and you look at the price tag.”

He then drew the parallel between window shopping and surrender: There is a price tag, and not everyone will be willing to pay the price.

“It’s easy to come to a conference or hear a good message and get all excited, but it’s what you do after the conference that counts.

“Surrender is hard work – to serve God you might have to sleep less, be left out of the fun others are having, read the Bible, actively live a holy life …

“Some things look good from afar, but when you go closer and realise the cost, will you still commit to it?”

Drawing reference from The Message version of Psalm 53:2, he asked the crowd again, “Who will be that one God-expectant man, that one God-ready woman?”

For God is looking for the one who is willing to stop window-shopping and pay the full price of surrender. The one willing to till the ground and usher in revival for the generation.


FOPx will be taking place this week from Thursday to Saturday, November 23-25, 2017. It will be held at Trinity Christian Centre (Days 1 and 2) and Bethesda Cathedral (Day 3). Tickets are priced at $40 per person and you can get them here. Night sessions are free and open to all!

Speakers include Lou Engle (co-founder of TheCall), Ben Fitzgerald (Director of Godfest Ministries) and various local Senior Pastors. 

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How to cling to love in a world of hate

by | 8 November 2017, 6:58 PM

In this world, evil seems to be gaining ground, but something greater is also awakening in the collective human conscience. We read about terror, but we also read about kindness. There are those intent on destroying lives, but there are also those who are intent on restoring life.


Despite the unrest of the world, love is not absent. At the front lines of conflict in the Greek forests of Samothrace – hot on the heels of violence and injustice – compassion shows up and loves. My heart is moved at the words of the Albanian policeman to the refugee whom he saved: “Do not be ashamed. I have also lived through a war. You are now my family and this is your house too.”

There are people who will refuse others even just a drink of water in their time of desperate need, but there are also people who will gladly receive others into their home, clothe them, and feed them. They do so because a truth convicts them: Aren’t we all brothers?

As much as we have a capacity for evil, we also have a capacity for good. There is a verse in the Bible that says this about sincere love: It is to hate what is evil and cling to what is good (Romans 12:9).

We can only do good to others, to the degree that we are personally disturbed by injustice and resolve to do something.

There is always something we can do, right where we are.

As a child, I wondered why I was fortunate enough to be born in Singapore. Are some people inherently more deserving of a better life than the others?

And how do we measure a good life? Are the lives of the young children in Vietnam who work 12-hour days in the field for meagre (by our standards) amounts of money absolutely worse off than the white-collar worker in Singapore who toils late into the night – just so he can avoid his family at home? We cannot answer on their behalf.

War, poverty and oppression are the big names in the business of curtailing the potential of a fulfilling life. But loneliness, brokenness, guilt, and a lack of worth – things common to the human race – also plague and damage a society like Singapore’s.

Have you struggled with these feelings? Do you know someone who does?

Eudaimonia, a Greek term described in 4th century BC by Aristotle, can be translated into “human flourishing” or “fulfillment”. An earlier philosopher, Socrates, saw eudaimonia as the goal of human desires and actions.

It is not the absence of evil that we are most in need of – it is the presence of God. Only that can restore to us life of the fullest measure.

People want to lead fulfilling lives. But human flourishing is not possible when purpose is absent, when people don’t feel that they are worthy, when they feel that there is no way to escape their meaningless life.

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” (John 10:10)

In the Biblical book of John, we get a picture of what evil does: It steals, kills and destroys. But in God’s hand is the counter-offer of a full life.

Our desire for the more abundant life isn’t new – it transcends culture and time periods. But when evil seems to be winning, how do we still trust in God’s offer for meaning and purpose?

God’s offer was not without recognition of the troubles we may face. So it is not the absence of evil that we are most in need of – it is the presence of God. Only that can restore to us life of the fullest measure.

“Our stories are all stories of searching. We search for a good self to be and for good work to do. We search to become human in a world that tempts us always to be less than human or looks to us to be more. We search to love and to be loved.” (Frederick Buechner)

Could it be that the ache of our hearts is to be useful – to be good, to do meaningful work, and to do good to others?

But somewhere in the middle of that journey, bad things can happen.

We experience hurt, we fall into disillusionment. Life can feel so unfair. The gap between our reality and our innate dreams feel so big. And in response, we may scale back our capacity for loving others to protect ourselves from getting hurt.

If there’s been a sense of hollowness in our heart, a feeling that there is something more that cannot be simply fulfilled by just wealth or achievements – would we consider believing that God is bigger than we know and closer than we think?

And in a world where it is often hard to believe in much of anything, we search to believe in something holy and beautiful and life-transcending that will give meaning and purpose to the lives we live. And in that process, God uses that person – the Christian – to help others find healing and flourishing too.” (Frederick Buechner)

Our flourishing cannot be achieved in isolation. God first calls us to Himself, and then to others whom He also loves. (1 Corinthians 12:26).

Closer to home, where compassion looks a lot different from rebuilding houses and homes torn apart by war and strife, we are not without suffering in our midst. There is rebuilding work of a different kind.

So how we view the child who is outcasted and bullied in school matters; what we think of the teenager who puts on a strong front to hide his fear matters; how we respond to the adult who has lived her entire life being told she will never make it in life … All that matters.

If there’s been a sense of hollowness in our heart, a feeling that there is something more that cannot be simply fulfilled by just wealth or achievements – would we consider believing that God is bigger than we know and closer than we think?

There is healing and a human flourishing which God makes available to us. And He also makes it available to others through us as vessels.

If we recognise our privilege of having been given what we have, we can find joy in offering kindness to another.

We want to love, and be loved. And there is risk in that. But take the risk to believe that God loves you and that you can love others. We have this hope in overcoming our natural self-centeredness.

Our hope is kept safe in the fact that we are profoundly loved by God, and that He has the ability to restore fullness of life to what was stolen, broken, and destroyed.

“I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33)

It’s a lesson that may take a while – and a little faith – but cling to God’s love and we will overcome in His love.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Nobody said it was easy

by | 22 October 2017, 1:27 AM

Pain, porridge and mashed potatoes.

If you’ve ever had braces for your teeth, you might know what I’m talking about. It’s been 7 months since I got mine, little metallic pieces glued permanently onto my teeth. 

Friends warned me of the wires and the ulcers, but I had decided that the other side of pain and suffering – straight teeth – was worth it. There are days when even speaking is hard, but I’ve never thought of quitting. Straight teeth will be worth it!

Doesn’t that paint a picture of the hope of transformation of our Christian walk itself?

We go through pain and suffering when we realise that what’s on the other side — being made more like Christ — is worth it (2 Corinthians 3:18).

When we make that decision to get aligned with His will, we don’t have to be discouraged when the growing gets tough – and sometimes downright impossible to endureInstead, we choose to rely on God’s grace to ultimately transform us into His likeness, if we stay the course (Philippians 1:6).

It will be daily hard work not to give free rein to our sinful nature – the natural way things are. But it’s always worth letting God do His work to change our carnal habits and straighten our slanted thought patterns.

Having grown up in a cage, it feels safer to remain a slave to our sin rather than be free in the wild. Left on our own, I believe most of us would rather take the path of least resistance than to fight.

In the holding room between slavery and the Promised Land, the Israelites sought the familiarity of a full stomach (Exodus 16:3). In bondage, they could eat all the meat they wanted. And after days and weeks and months of God-given manna out in the wilderness, they suddenly found themselves craving the “comforts” of slavery over their freedom.

Sound familiar?

When we make that decision to get aligned with His will, we don’t have to be discouraged when the growing gets tough.

It was in the uncomfortable desert that the Israelites’ true nature — their preference for temporal comfort and instant gratification — was brought to light. They had cried out for years for deliverance, yet had somehow forgotten God’s divine intervention and mercy in granting them exactly what they wanted (Exodus 3:9-10).

For as long as we refuse to let God’s Word convict us of our sins (James 1:22-25) and anchor our hope in His faithfulness to have our best interests at heart always, we will remain unchanged, unrepentant and ungrateful. To yank open the curtains and let light expose the truth about us, that’s scary. But we’re doing it for the God of love (1 John 4:16).

You were taught, with regard to your former way of life, to put off your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires; to be made new in the attitude of your minds; and to put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.” (Ephesians 4:22-24)

I believe God has a bigger plan for you than to let you remain in your old ways.

Our old self is corrupted and deceitful. We must abandon it for good, putting on the new self as God’s blood-bought children.

God promised the Israelites ownership of an entire land flowing with milk and honey, yet the Israelites would rather be slaves for meat. But we are no longer slaves. When we’re inclined to grumble as the Israelites did, let’s remember that God can give us more than we can ever hope for ourselves (Ephesians 3:20) – even if we do not see it yet . 

Don’t lose your faith in the holding room. Grace began the work in us and Grace will see us through. Our inheritance is on the other side of faith and patience (Hebrews 6:11-12), and it will be worth it.

Nobody said it was going to be easy. But neither does it have to be that hard.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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The grand old man and his treasure

by | 20 October 2017, 5:23 PM

“Yes, boy, you may pick the most expensive toy in the shop, and I’ll give it to you.”

The owner of the toy shop, a grand old man, came beside the boy, crouched down, and asked him: “Would you give up all your other toys in exchange for it?”

He saw the boy’s excitement quickly fade when he said this. He had seen the same look in the eyes of the other children who had come through his doors before.

“Thank you sir, that sounds like a nice offer, but I will pass.”

They couldn’t see how even the most expensive toy in that shop was worth giving up all their toys for.

And that’s how the grand old man’s prized treasure remained on the highest shelf. No one was willing to give up all their toys for it.

Until one day, another young boy wandered onto the street where the toy shop stood.

For the first time, someone realised that the old man was offering him something quite extraordinary, to someone so undeserving.

The grand old man saw him from afar, and beckoned him over.

In a kind voice, he said what he always said, “Boy, you may pick the most expensive toy in the store, and I’ll give it to you. Would you also give up all your other toys, in exchange for it?”

“But even if I gave you all I have, it won’t be enough,” the boy said.

For the first time, someone had realised that fact.

The grand old man beamed, “Yes, boy, I know, but that’s why I’m giving it away – to you.”

“But why would you do that? Why would you give me your treasure?”

Again, for the first time, someone realised that the old man was offering him something quite extraordinary, to someone so undeserving.

“I’m looking for someone who would treasure it,” the old man said. “And you, my child, are someone who understands what I’m saying here.”

“Yes, sir, I do understand what you’re saying. Please wait for me, I will go home at once to gather my things.”

The story of the grand old man and his expensive treasure is the story of God and us.

In our story, yours and mine, God offers us Jesus Christ (John 3:16).

For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Roman 6:23)

The gift of God – Jesus Christ – doesn’t seem terribly extravagant, or even necessary, until we feel the sting of sicknesss, disease and death.

The gift of God – Jesus Christ – doesn’t seem that desirable and precious to us, until we taste the bitterness of sin.

God’s gift of eternal life is not one for polite display, casual entertainment or back-of-mind remembrance.

To receive Jesus – God’s treasure – is to receive forgiveness for our sins and mistakes. To receive Jesus is to know our Maker and to spend our lives with Him – it’s life as it should be, life as it can be.

“Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” (Revelation 3:20)

The giving up of our personal treasures – all that we have – can never be the key to receiving God’s gift that He freely gives.

From the moment we can even begin to understand what the gift of Jesus Christ truly means for us, as the second young boy in the story did, it will show:

“But why would you do that? Why would you give me your treasure?”

God’s heart for us is that we understand His heart for us:

“The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field. When a man found it, he hid it again, and then in his joy went and sold all he had and bought that field.”

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant looking for fine pearls. When he found one of great value, he went away and sold everything he had and bought it.” 

(Matthew 13:44-46)

The gift of salvation, of Jesus Christ, of welcome into God’s kingdom – cannot be bought; it can only be received.

Therefore, the giving up of our personal treasures – all that we have – can never be the key to receiving God’s gift that He freely gives.

It is but an indicator (Matthew 6:21) that we have indeed realised – and now see – the surpassing worth of having God in our lives:

“Yes, Sir, I do understand what You’re saying. Please wait for me, I will go home at once to gather my things.”

Everything else pales in comparison.

And God waits for us, as the grand old man did at the doors of his toy shop, for His children to come to Him, in joy, so that He may give us the very Kingdom itself:

“But seek his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well. Do not be afraid, little flock, for your Father has been pleased to give you the kingdom.” (Luke 12:31-32)

As A.W. Tower led his readers in prayer in The Pursuit of God: “Father, I want to know You, but my coward heart fears to give up its toys. I cannot part with them without inward bleeding, and I do not try to hide from You the terror of parting. I come trembling, but I do come. Please root from my heart all those things which I have cherished so long and which have become a very part of my living self, so that You may enter and dwell there without rival.” Amen.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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What if I’m just a calefare?

by | 12 October 2017, 3:48 PM

As you scan the crowded bus for a seat, you see a familiar book cover. Ah, somebody’s reading the same book as you! At the cinema, the crowd’s in-sync surround-sound laughter triggers a split second where awareness meets detachment – you’re again reminded that we’re not all that different.

We co-exist in the same time and space, together with a lot of people. We are passersby in the blurry background of a stranger’s story – hundreds of times a day – but that sense of vagueness is easily broken by a smile, a collective chuckle in a movie, a “today weather very hot ah“, a shared interest with a fellow human …

These connections tug on our heartstrings to the extent that you allow it. And if you do, the music that it makes cannot be ignored. There is something grand and poetic about our existence –  listen close enough and you’ll hear it. 

But life is never easy to navigate. It’s like buying furniture from IKEA, you have to assemble it, put things together. And you cannot opt for assembly service.

Top of the World” by the Carpenters was my favourite song growing up. Back in the day, home printers weren’t a thing yet so I would hand-write the lyrics on paper and sing my heart out to it.

“Such a feeling’s coming over me, there is wonder in most everything I see.”

That was my favourite line (if I really had to choose one) from the theme song of my childhood. When I first stepped foot into primary school, I was that kid who was always filled with wonder and ready to conquer the world.

And you can probably guess what’s coming next.

The rose-tinted lens through which I saw life began to lose its sheen. Nothing seemed to be happening for me anymore.

I didn’t feel as special as I used to, my family was falling apart, and I was lagging behind at school.

The new recurring theme of disappointment in my life made me consider if perhaps I was born just to be a film extra – a calefare, a nobody – in the grand scheme of things. Maybe I just wasn’t main-character material.

Yet in my heart, I knew that it wasn’t so. There was a gulf that had to be bridged – one within my very conscience. How could I possibly feel like a nobody and a somebody at the same time?

“You’re nobody till somebody loves you
You’re nobody till somebody cares”

(Russ Morgan, Larry Stock, and James Cavanaugh)

These lines are from the famous pop song first published in 1946 and made popular by Dean Martin. It’s one of those things that sound like a truism. But is it?

If a child came up to me, crying, saying that he feels unloved, I probably wouldn’t tell him that there is a possibility he might be right, even if I felt that way about myself sometimes.

I would ask him about his parents, his friends and his family. And even if the evidence shows that that child is indeed unloved by all the people who should have loved him – we know in our hearts that he should be loved. 

Some of us would rather be convinced that we are not nobody, but isn’t there greater comfort in knowing that we’re loved by somebody?

“But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8)

God, the King of all Heaven and Earth, fought to be our somebody.

Regardless whether you believe in God, the fact remains: God loves you and so gave His life so that you may know His love for you.

And if there’s even just a smidgen of hope in your heart that you are not nobody, despite what circumstances might suggest, would you consider the possibility that it is because God – the greatest Somebody – first loved you? 

Even before your parents could, even before anyone else did, He loved you.

When someone says that “Jesus died on the cross for you”, it can sound quite jarring. I used to think that it was a bit uncalled for since I didn’t ask Him to die for me! But if Jesus didn’t die for us (John 3:16), we cannot say for certain that He loves us.

Would you consider the possibility that it is because God – the greatest Somebody – first loved you?

We are all valuable because God first loved us. And that is the firm foundation for our worth, one worthy to build our lives upon (2 Thessalonians 3:5).

What are the things that give you a sense of security in your worth as a person?

Is it a big loving family? A great group of friends (#squadgoals), a 10/10 spouse, or a promising career?

If there is even a chance – no matter how slight – that those things may fail you, then it is at best shifting-sand when compared to the security that God’s love promises us.

“For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 8:38-39)

Knowledge of this Love frees us to persist in wonder, no matter what life throws at us.

You’re somebody because God loves you!

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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I’m way too bad at goodbyes

by | 9 October 2017, 4:20 PM

Sam Smith says he’s too good at goodbyes. Me too.

I used to pride myself on being the stronger person – that I’d be the one who would get over a relationship faster. I’m the one who feels less. I’m the one who loves less. I’ll get out before it’s over.

In the game of relationships, I had to be the better player.

But in the pursuit of proving myself, I forgot to ask: Even if I win, what’s the prize? So I found out the hard way, one day, when it was Game Over and I didn’t get to say goodbye first.

Player 1 left, and I was left hanging.

Everything people said about breakups was true. There’s nothing more maddening than to have clichés come true in your own life. I finally understood why people use the term “heart-wrenching” – it felt that way.

Even the air I breathed felt thinned out – it was suffocating, and I didn’t know if I could ever recover as all the lights in my world started to dim.

I wanted time to stop. I wanted everyone else to stop what they were doing. How could life go on like that?

But on the outside, I tried my best to function. I smiled, I ate, and I worked. But with my bedroom door closed, in the very room where I heard him say goodbye, I could barely manage to stand.

For days, I laid on the floor in my room because I couldn’t do anything else. I don’t think I’d ever felt this much pain in my life. I was angry and I was mad. But I knew I had to stay alive.

So I ran to a quiet room – to meet with God. It sounds like a cliché, doesn’t it – “Yeah, go to God.” But it was the only thing I knew could save me from the overwhelming grief that threatened to swallow me up.

I sat there with a box of tissues. I didn’t ask for answers, I didn’t even ask why it had to happen. I simply asked for His presence.

God didn’t show up like a genie, because my pain didn’t go away immediately. He didn’t come in a rushing wind, or in any dramatic fashion, and my heart was still in pieces.

But in my brokenness, I saw my desperate need for God. God was my lifeline and I refused to let go.

You will cry a lot, but don’t let go.

My road out of the confusing fog of pain was a long one, and it wasn’t always clear if I really was walking out of it. But I was thankful for the drab routines. It was in the winding journey of showing up for work and my small conversations with strangers that life began to form again in the shell of a person I had become.

Everything in me screamed for isolation, but God knew that I needed people. So at my new workplace, without even mentioning my newly-broken heart, I began to experience healing – just by being in the company of people.

In the months ahead, I learnt to laugh again. And I learnt to feel. The raw and fierce pain wrapped up in my heart helped me to empathise with others who are also hurting, others who are also in pits of despair of their own.

In the messy aftermath of aborted relationships, failure and regrets are never far away. But I now know that grace and mercy are also never far away.

There are days when I felt like I’ve moved on, and then other days when out of nowhere, my old friend grief comes by and reminds me of the things I don’t need. Don’t you wish for complete closure? Don’t you want more answers? You’re a failure!

When anxiety wants to take over and replay the unpleasant memories, I’ve learnt that the only way out of it to refuse going down that path.

Unlike Sam Smith, I don’t think I need to be good at it, but I have to say goodbye.

Heartache is always just one ingredient in the nasty concoction of lost love. In the messy aftermath of aborted relationships, failure and regrets are never far away.

And from my own experience, I know that grace and mercy are also never far away. It came in the form of work that kept me occupied. It came in the quiet knowing that I’m going be okay. It came in my resolve to want to be okay. It came in God’s outstretched arm to me.

I don’t know how He did it, but God used every bit of my pain to bring me closer to Him. It wasn’t wasted. I could have easily gone the other way – further away from Him and deeper into the grave of self-pity – but I’m grateful that He saved me from that.

The girl who wanted to be good at goodbyes was simply afraid of being unloved. I used to believe that I wasn’t worthy of love because I’m not pretty enough. I believed that who I am wasn’t enough. I believed that I had to carry my family baggage of divorce forever. 

I wanted to be proven wrong – to find someone who would never leave. I had to learn that that’s a job only God can do. He alone can love us perfectly and give us worth.

When everything fell to the ground, I was destroyed. But bit by bit, over 6 months, God spoke His truth into me. He relaid my foundation when He told me that I am loved by Him, no matter what happened in the past.

He got me to rethink the notion that I had to carry my family baggage forever, because it just wasn’t true. So I surrendered it and finally accepted the new life that He gives, and left the old one behind – for good.

So … I don’t have to be good at goodbyes anymore.

And neither do you. If you’re going through a similar experience – you’ll be okay, because God loves you, and His love is a dependable one (Romans 8:38-39). If you doubt that God loves you, ask Him to show it to you. Let God– not another woman or man – prove it to you.

/ fiona@thir.st

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Are you favourite child material?

by | 2 October 2017, 5:26 PM

“Madam Lim doesn’t hate anyone in our class. She loves everyone. But she doesn’t have to like everyone.”

That was my reply to a classmate when we were in Primary 3.

We were walking in twos up a makeshift staircase to our temporary assembly hall as my friend asked the group, perhaps as a trick question: “Do you think Madam Lim hates anyone in our class?”

It was not plausible to my nine-year-old mind then that our teacher could hate any student in the class, hence my answer.

But I also knew it was one thing not to be hated, but another thing to be liked as a child.

In my young mind, since everyone is already loved – as if by default – to be liked was the elusive element that made it more desirable. 

To be loved but not liked felt like a lesser trophy, a consolation prize.

Perhaps it was the #asianparenting; I knew they loved me – but I wasn’t always convinced that my parents liked me. Especially when I failed my Math exam, when I didn’t match up to other kids in some way, or when I didn’t get into that secondary school.

Few of us might contest that our parents love us, but the debate on who’s the favourite child – the one they like most – can be a touchy topic.

And perhaps that’s why some of us get tired of hearing “God loves you”.

“He says that to everyone! And I’m sure He likes (so and so) more.”

You might not be challenging the notion that God loves you in general, but you may be unconvinced that He really likes you – specifically you. 

Think about the people you’d want to hang out with for lunch – these are the ones you like. You enjoy their company, you’re interested in their opinion on things and you want to hear about what’s going on in their lives.

And the truth is, that’s how God feels about us. He’s not indifferent; his love is not lavished upon us indiscriminately or casually – but very purposefully. He knew what He was signing up for when He proclaimed His feelings towards you on the Cross. 

God knows each of us.

“For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well.”
(Psalm 139:13-14)

And He likes us! He wants to hear about what’s going on in our lives. He doesn’t just love you out of obligation or from afar. He’s deeply interested in all that goes on in our lives and He wants to be with us.

“Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.” (Philippians 4:6)

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” (Matthew 11:28)

“When I said, ‘My foot is slipping,’ your unfailing love, Lord, supported me. When anxiety was great within me, your consolation brought me joy.” (Psalm 94:18-19)

“The Lord your God is with you, the Mighty Warrior who saves. He will take great delight in you; in his love he will no longer rebuke you, but will rejoice over you with singing.” (Zephaniah 3:17)

Dare you let your heart rest in the truth that your heavenly Father delights in you?

He doesn’t compare you to the next person and He doesn’t ask you why aren’t you like so and so. God made you in His image (Genesis 1:27) and you – yes you! – are wonderful to Him.

So won’t you lay aside your buts and ifs and boldly love Him back?

When we finally come to a place where we know once and for all that we will always be deeply loved (Psalm 100:5) by our Father, our love for Him shall never wane – but only grow with each passing day.

That’s what a favourite child’s love for his perfect Father looks like.

Will you be His favourite child?

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Mission: Possible

by | 29 September 2017, 10:45 AM

The topic of missions is not a comfortable one to talk about – sometimes not even in our cell groups. It questions our willingness to do the unnatural and the uncomfortable.

But we have a mission – and a Great Commission – to accomplish.

If we see ourselves as His disciples, our Christian mission is a singular purpose we orient our lives around, and it doesn’t always involve an air ticket to a faraway place. Mission doesn’t have to mean overseas trip.

Check the thesaurus – other words for mission are “purpose” and “function”. When we look at it this way, we recognise that our lives are meant to be lived as an answer to God’s call. That’s our purpose, our function. Our mission.

And while we all have the same mission (Matthew 28:19-20), we may be called to carry out our mission in multiple ways.

Here are 9 different realms of missions to help us get some handles on our mission – what we are called to.

WHICH OF THESE 9 FORMS OF MISSIONS ARE YOU CALLED TO?

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EVANGELISM
Isaiah 52:7, Luke 10:1-9, Mark 1:15

What emotions does the word evangelism stir up in you?

I’m a first-generation Christian who only got to hear about Jesus because a secondary school classmate plucked up the courage to tell me about the Christ. So when I think about evangelism, it’s a picture of Jesus reaching out to me through my friend.

To evangelise is to tell the story of what God has done for us through Jesus Christ.

We are not the gift; Jesus is. We point people to the Source, the Living Water, so that they might find Him, quenching their thirst for a real Hope in all of life’s conundrums.

Think about your mission: Are there people around me who hasn’t heard of the story of Jesus? Am I living a lifestyle of evangelism? Am I mindful to build genuine relationships with my friends and neighbours? Do I enjoy telling other people about Jesus?

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RECONCILIATION
2 Corinthians 5:17-20, Matthew 5:9, Matthew 5:43-45

God kickstarted the work of reconciling all man back to Him when he sent Jesus to the world, so that through him, our sins may be atoned for and forgiven. Jesus was the Way (John 14:6) for us to return to God.

The mission continues today for all of us Christians whom God has called to be His ambassadors: Through acts of forgiveness, we provide people with access to healing and restoration that comes from God. We’re called to be peace-makers.

Think about your mission: Are there people we need to reconcile with? Are there people we can bring together for reconciliation? Are there divisive social issues that we can intercede for to ask for God’s move of reconciliation?

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CONTEXTUALISATION
1 Corinthians 9:19-23, Acts 15:28-29

Jesus came for the world – that’s a lot of people. A lot of different people.

The good thing is that Jesus didn’t call us to all be the same, we only have to be like Him. And depending on the cultures that we are from, even that may look a little different.

That’s where contextualisation comes into the picture. It’s about bringing the Gospel to people wherever they are, helping them to understand what it means to follow, love, and honour God in their culture.

Because we are so different, we express our love for God in different ways. People should be able to love Christ without having to dress, worship, or do things the same way as us.

Think about your mission: How can we bring Jesus to people from other cultures in our community? How can I help them to understand the gospel? How can I encourage them to lead a Godly lifestyle within their culture?

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MERCY
Micah 6:8; James 1:27

Mercy is the healing balm that heals hearts and restores relationships, but it’s not a quick-fix solution. Mercy cannot be applied through batch processing.

The act of mercy requires us to care for people, one person at a time, just as Jesus tends to each of us personally.

Mercy is the practice of serving others, especially the needy, poor, and disadvantaged. And it requires love, time, and humility. When we respond with mercy to the people around us, we respond to God’s love towards us.

Think about your mission: How can we extend God’s love towards the poor and needy? Are there people in my community whom I can show mercy to? Can I regularly carve out a portion of my free time to help those who are in need?

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ADVOCACY
Esther 4:13-14, Proverbs 31:8-9, Nehemiah 5:1-12

Advocacy. It’s a big word. But if you pray for others, you’re already an advocate – someone who raises a case to God on behalf of someone else.

An advocate is also someone who supports a cause. Advocacy is the act of transforming political and social structures to align more closely with the Kingdom of God.

Some ways to advocate God’s kingdom could be by creating awareness, exposing evil agendas (eg human trafficking), showing solidarity and mobilising the church to act.

Is there a particular cause or injustice that you feel needs to be changed? Regardless of your position in society, there is something you can do as an advocate who is on a mission.

Think about your mission: What are some social issues we see a need for advocacy? Disadvantaged youths; foreign workers; marriages; families. Will I play a part in bringing God’s kingdom here on earth as it is in heaven (Matthew 6:10)?

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FRIENDSHIP
1 John 1:3, John 15:13-15, James 2:23

God first extended friendship to us (John 15:15). And friendship is Jesus’s way of reaching people regardless of their status in society, gender, or religion.

Jesus crossed cultural boundaries (Matthew 4:9) to befriend the Samaritan woman at the well; He knew the state of her life, spoke to her need and offered her a way out. Jesus saw Zacchaeus, a tax collector hated by many, and stayed at his house and forgave him.

Friendships built on long-term relationships lead to mutual personal transformation or societal change. It’s how we display God’s love to the people around us, in or out of the church.

If you want to display God’s love, build friendships. With friendship, people no longer become “conversion targets” or goals in an outreach project, but lives that Jesus came to rescue. A soul isn’t a statistic.

Think about your mission: Are we passive in cultivating and maintaining friendships? What is our attitude towards our co-labourers in ministry? Are we driven by task or love?

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INTER-RELIGIOUS CONNECTIONS
2 Kings 5:1-6, 1 Peter 3:15, Acts 17:16-21

How often do you come into contact with someone of a different faith? And have you taken the time to understand where they come from?

Paul modelled it for us. When he was in Athens, he didn’t only talk about the good news of God in church, but spoke in the marketplace (Acts 17:16-17) as well. By placing himself in the marketplace, Paul had the opportunity to speak to people of different faiths, and in turn, got to speak about his own faith in God.

A group of Greek philosophers invited him to speak (Acts 17:19-20). Though some sneered at him because he spoke about God’s power, still some others became followers of God because of what they had heard (Acts 17:32-24).

Think about your mission: How are we cultivating friendships with those from other faiths? How well do we understand their faiths and customs? How can I boldly yet respectfully proclaim my own faith?

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CREATION CARE
Genesis 1:28, Genesis 2:15, Deuteronomy 10:14

By caring for God’s creation, particularly the natural world, we are being good stewards. If God affirms that His creation is good, then as His good stewards, we need to be responsible with it.

We know the 3Rs: Reduce, reuse, recycle. But we don’t often see it as part of our Christian mission. Exercising care for the world that God created goes beyond a national campaign or political agenda.

So the next time you see a poster to “make every drop count”, remember our Creator’s part in giving us everything we have on Earth, and our responsibility not to take this gift for granted.

Think about your mission: Do we recognise that our natural world was created by God? Do we see ourselves as a steward of God’s creation?

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HOLY SPIRIT
Acts 1:8, John 20:21-23, Romans 15:13

“Mission is, from first to last, the work of the Holy Spirit.” (Scott Sunquist)

Our quest to fulfil the mission cannot be done apart from the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit empowers us to be participants in God’s mission. By the Spirit we have supernatural power to change the hearts of men and bring salvation to them.

There is no contest where the resurrection power of God is concerned – He alone conquered death. And because of that – we have a Mission Possible.

Think about your mission: Do we depend on the Holy Spirit’s leading in my daily life? Do I recognise the power of the Holy Spirit? Do I operate in the power of the Holy Spirit or in my own strength?

Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” (Matthew 28:16-20)


The 9 practices of mission were adapted by Pastor Eunice Low from Bethesda (Bedok-Tampines) Church, from her studies at Fuller Theological Seminary, in a module titled “Practices of Mission”.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Reflections on sudden deaths and unexpected tragedy: Our time will come

by | 27 September 2017, 5:46 PM

I knew Steven Lim, but I hadn’t heard of Pradip Subramanian. Not until the news started to pour in.

Subramanian, the president of the World Bodybuilding & Physique Sports Federation (WBPF) Singapore wing, had died an hour after a celebrity Muay Thai match at the Asia Fighting Championship (AFC) on September 23, 2017. He wasn’t even supposed to be in the ring – he was a last-minute stand-in for Sylvester Sim, who pulled out citing insurance concerns.

With all the fake news around today, I wish this had been fake news.

Death is all over the headlines. In the last few weeks, we’ve tuned in to news about multiple Category 5 hurricanes devastating North and Central America, and earthquakes in Central and South-west Mexico.

But those are in countries halfway around the world, and the news is reduced to mere numbers – death tolls. Sometimes it’s hard, from this distance, to really grasp the tragedy unfolding. Which is why, sometimes, the news of an unexpected and sudden death closer to home hits us harder.

Pradip’s death hits harder because he’s one of us. He’s a young Singaporean son, just 32 years old. Earlier this month, we lost another – an even younger soldier – in an army training exercise mishap.

This life matters only because of what follows it. How are we living our lives?

Death is no respecter of persons, and it could be any one of us next.

A traffic accident, sudden heart failure, or cancer – life can come to a sudden halt at any time. Death, especially the passing of a loved one, brings us to the solemn realisation that life really is short.

Memento mori. Death is a certainty, a prognosis we cannot run from. The day to say goodbye to our loved ones will come, or maybe it will be them bidding us farewell. It may come sooner than expected, or in ways we never thought would befall us.

Time runs out for everyone. And only a few things will hold up when that day comes:

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. (Matthew 6:19-20)

You do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. (James 4:14)

What is your life? What is worth living for? What is worth dying for? What are we fighting for?

Many people say it’s about the legacy they leave behind. But the Bible teaches me that, someday, that too shall pass.

See, I will create new heavens and a new earth.
The former things will not be remembered, nor will they come to mind. (Isaiah 65:17)

The world and its desires pass away, but whoever does the will of God lives forever. (1 John 2:17)

Nothing of this earth, in this life, will stand the test of time. Not the heavens and earth as they now stand. Not the world and its desires. Not our monuments, accolades, wealth, plaudits, dreams, ambitions.

This life matters only because of what follows it. In the light of eternity, how are we living our lives?

/ fiona@thir.st

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Chicken soup for the Cineleisure Auntie

by | 20 September 2017, 5:39 PM

“Have you bought anything from her before?”
“No …”

I still wish I could change my answer. I wish I had bought something from her.

My friend was referring to the “Cineleisure Auntie” – a familiar white-haired stranger who used to sit at one of the busiest intersections on Orchard Road. Perhaps you’ve seen her between Mandarin Gallery and H&M, ever-present with an assortment of food items to sell.

Feeling guilty, I did think about buying something from her every time we crossed paths, maybe stay for a chat. Yet I chose not to, for there was always somewhere else to be – I never had enough reason to stay.

Next time, I reasoned.

Several months later, I would finally do something for that old auntie – just not in a way I ever expected.

 JUNE 6, 2014. I was in a morning class at school.

Out of the blue, Cineleisure Auntie suddenly popped into my head. I was surprised at the sheer strength of the impulse to look for her. 

I knew I had to.

I messaged a few friends who also knew her about my decision so I wouldn’t back out. I began to think and plan that afternoon: What could I bring for her? Does she drink coffee? Maybe I could bring doughnuts …

Then, one of my friends replied my text message.

Cineleisure Auntie had been hospitalised. I would not be able to find her at her usual spot anymore. This setback would surely have ended my quest in the past, but somehow, it was different this time.

As I waited for more news, I decided to go home to see if there was anything I could bring along in the event someone discovered her exact whereabouts. On my way back, I received another text message.

In the message was the name of the hospital and ward number Cineleisure Auntie was staying in.

When I got home, I was greeted by a surprised Mum – I wasn’t supposed to be home till later. She pointed to a large pot on the dining table and said, “I had a prompting in my heart that I should make soup today, even though none of you will be home for dinner tonight.”

The voices of doubt that had been stirring in my heart faded away.

Later, at about 2 in the afternoon, Mum and I arrived at Singapore General Hospital – armed with a thermos flask of chicken soup.

Block 6, Level 4, Ward 64, Room 18, Bed 5. I recited those lines several times in my mind while waiting in line to get a visitor pass.

I wondered what Cineleisure Auntie would be like: Would she welcome us? Does she speak Mandarin – or only dialect? Why is she in the hospital?

It was a big and open ward. There were eight beds and no privacy. Bed 5 was all the way inside, but it was by the window, at least. Cineleisure Auntie’s hair looked a lot whiter than I had remembered.

“Hello, Ah Ma.”

And with that, we became friends. Cineleisure Auntie warmed up to us quickly, especially when I told her I was a student. But what really worked was that pot of chicken soup.

Mum told Cineleisure Auntie that Heaven is where God is – a place where there would be no more pain.

Over the next two days, we bonded over Ben & Jerry’s and bird’s nest. We learnt that she was suffering from Stage 4 colon cancer. Her condition was deteriorating fast; her doctor had lifted her dietary restrictions so that she could enjoy the time she had left.

Though she would drift in and out of consciousness, Cineleisure Auntie’s wits were always sharp whenever she awoke. In her lucid moments, we talked about our Teochew roots, and sometimes about the discomfort that she was feeling in her abdomen.

Mum talked to her about Heaven. She told her that Heaven is where God is – a place where there would be no more pain (Revelation 21:4).

It was my first time hearing about Heaven in dialect, and while I only understood bits and pieces of what they were talking about, I could see in Cineleisure Auntie’s eyes that she was listening intently. I believe she understood everything that was being shared with her.

Finally, my Mum asked her to pray to Jesus and welcome Him into her heart. She did.

Four days later, she slipped into a coma and passed away shortly after.

Although Cineleisure Auntie lived alone and had no kin, she wasn’t alone in her last days at the hospital. A group of friends were there for her daily, rallied by a young student named Shermaine, who had befriended her during her hawking days. 

Facebook user Tere Han had posted about Cineleisure Auntie’s deteriorating health condition. Shermaine responded by tracking her down, from her house to the hospital she was admitted to.

If it wasn’t for Shermaine, who persisted in looking for an old lady she was not obliged to care for, or our mutual friend who helped me connect the dots, I may never have been able to meet Cineleisure Auntie.

I also suspect that if it wasn’t for Diane – the writer who chronicled her encounter with Cineleisure Auntie in a blog post that went viral – I may not have kept her in my mind for as long as I did. Only now do I realise to my amazement that the day I made my very first hospital visit to meet Cineleisure Auntie was an exact year after Diane’s post was published.

Each of us had our own story as to how we got to know Cineleisure Auntie, but I know that God was the common thread that linked our stories together.

She may have spent most of her days surrounded by strangers passing her by, but at the end of her life, Cineleisure Auntie was surrounded by family, albeit of a different kind – people God had sent to bring her back to Him.

Each of us had our own story as to how we got to know Cineleisure Auntie, but I know that God was the common thread that linked our stories together.

He was the most important company she would keep during her final days on earth – and in the days beyond. All because we responded to the call to bring her some chicken soup and the Good News of Jesus Christ (John 3:16).

As we watched Cineleisure Auntie’s coffin roll past the viewing gallery into the furnace, the heavy atmosphere was punctured by joy when someone shouted: “Ah Ma, see you in Heaven!”

God, I’m so glad I got to meet Ah Ma. And I can’t wait to see her again.

/ fiona@thir.st

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Am I who my résumé says I am?

by | 17 September 2017, 8:28 AM

What do you say if someone asked you about yourself?

We’ve been through the drill in school – wait for your turn, think of something witty but not over-the-top, stand up in front of a group of strangers, deliver it.

As we go into higher education or into the working world, we meet people who are less like us – in terms of age, education background, or personality – and the pressure to impress can get #real.

To introduce ourselves, most of us might bring up our work – what we’re studying or do for a living – it comes quite instinctively as a normal (and effective!) act of self-disclosure to new acquaintances. It’s personal but not too personal.

But whenever our work comes up in a conversation, it’s hard to avoid the comparison game, isn’t it?

Sometimes you hear it in the chorus that the impressed group makes when they hear a job title that commands admiration, “Wah, doctor ah!”

Other times you hear it in the falling intonation from your new friend who hasn’t even heard of your company – “Oh…”

Work has been as inextricably tied to our identity as our names are; it’s what we tell people about ourselves. And more than we might realise, it has become what we feel makes us valuable and useful.

I had a fleeting thought one day: What if all my certificates and achievements over the years become nullified?

There will be a considerable amount of unraveling that’ll take place if my qualifications were no longer valid. All our hard work down the drain aside, are we still who we think we are?

For some of us, that thought is frightening. Perhaps because we’ve more to lose, perhaps because we’ve staked so much of our worth on our achievements.

When I look at my own résumé, it doesn’t seem to be much, especially when I compare myself to my peers who have not just studied at great universities abroad, but also excelled in their side pursuits.

But then I recognise that it is much in its own way.

While it may not win the jostle for a coveted job at a big firm, my résumé is a covert testimony.

If we know where to look, we can find gold – not just in our achievements, but in our personal triumphs too.

In the empty spaces between lines of black Helvetica, in the unwritten – lie the stories of our lives. We’ve gone through so much as people on a journey and we sometimes overlook the precious, personal details. Only we know the unwritten things. 

Only I know the lengths of which my mother went to ensure my education wasn’t disrupted by changes in the family. Only I know the emotional struggle I experienced trying to fit in at school. Only I know that it is by sheer grace that I have come so far.     

And these things don’t always show on the sheets of paper on which we summarise our “professional lives”.

“We live in a society that encourages us to think about how to have a great career but leaves many of us inarticulate about how to cultivate the inner life.” (David Brooks, author and New York Times columnist)

Résumés are created for scrutiny – often quite ruthlessly– but if we know where to look, we can find gold – not just in our achievements, but in our personal triumphs too. And if we miss those things, we risk placing all our worth in our achievements.

Take stock! Our personal growth cultivates in us something that cannot be nullified – it’s our inner life. Don’t neglect the seemingly uninspiring and unique details of your life, they may not be remarkable to the #haters, but they count for more than words can say. 

They count towards a story that is yours, written by the same God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Exodus 3:6). 

It may take you some time to see the greatness in you, but it’s there. So don’t stop smoothing out the rough edges and allowing yourself to be moulded into the person God made you to be (2 Corinthians 3:18).

So, yes, I am who my résumé says I am – and a whole lot more too.

/ fiona@thir.st

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Weighing the cost of an iPhone X

by | 14 September 2017, 5:08 PM

I remember my first.

It didn’t resemble a brick. Instead, it was yellow and black, like a bumblebee; the first mobile phone I remember ever seeing was an Ericsson. This was in 1997.

My mum’s new gadget – it wasn’t smart, but by no means was it dumb – was all the rage in my family. Everyone wanted to try the flip cover and type on the number pad. So satisfyingly analogue.

I got my first mobile phone (I think it was a Nokia 6100) a few years later. It didn’t matter that I didn’t have anyone else other than my parents to send text messages to – I had my own phone and I could do this:

That was the era of dial-up internet access, GPRS and ASCII christmas trees (before emojis 🎄).

In 2007, Steve Jobs gave us the first iPhone – the original iPhone. I got my first iPhone the following year, but I didn’t have a 3G phone plan, so it was practically useless without a WiFi connection.

I brought my new gadget everywhere anyway – because that’s what you do when you had an iPhone.

It was as much a status symbol as it is today. And it has always been priced as a premium product – the 32GB version of the iPhone 4 saw the crossing of the thousand-dollar threshold in Singapore.

Fast forward a decade, and the most expensive iPhone ever was launched on Tuesday (September 13).

But consumers aren’t so sure about jumping straight in this time round, because the iPhone X – Apple’s top-of-the-line 10th-anniversary iPhone – sells upwards of S$1,648 (without a phone contract!) in Singapore.

William Jevons, an English economist, wrote in 1871 that the value of a product depends on how much a person desired it. Consumers create value, not the producer.

The iPhone is a premium product and its value was never intended to be a function of the cost of the product.

How much you pay is a measure of what you truly value.

MY PALACE VS HIS TEMPLE

Maybe you, like me, sometimes struggle when it comes to holding back on spending in this age of conspicuous consumption.

Think about our readiness to spend on good things for ourselves, and compare that to our desire to spend on God. Giving to build His church, sowing into His kingdom, tithing.

There’s an equivalent comparison in the Bible. King Solomon built a splendorous temple for God (1 Kings 6:2), according to the specifications that God had given Him. You’d think that would be a good thing, right?

But the very next chapter (1 Kings 7:1-2) details the palace he built for himself. It took 13 years to complete, almost double the 7 years it took to build the temple.

According to the dimensions stated, the temple was 36,000 cubic cubits large (a cubit was a measurement based on the length of a forearm). But Solomon’s own palace measured 150,000 cubic cubits – more than four times larger than the temple he had built for God.

What about you? Do you spend more time and money building your own palace than His temple? Would you be willing to build a temple unto God that is bigger than your own palace?

Or even if we don’t spend much money on ourselves, are we actually using our resources to do what God has called us to do? We could be avoiding doing all the “wrong” things like spending on big-ticket, luxury items, yet never actually invest in the things that matter to God – putting our money where our mouth is.

Do you spend more time and money building your own palace than His temple? Would you be willing to build a temple unto God that is bigger than your own palace?

King Solomon may have gotten carried away with the scale of his palace, but there was one thing he did right: He built God’s temple first. It’s the principle from Haggai 1:4, which asks of the people: “Is it a time for you yourselves to be living in your panelled houses, while this house (the Temple of God) remains a ruin?”

When we put God first in how we use our money, time and all our other resources, it reflects who the King of our heart is.

This isn’t a call to false, legalistic modesty. I’m not saying to hold off a purchase just so you can say you did. Depravation for depravation’s sake is meaningless. All I’m saying is, whether or not you’re getting one of the new iPhones – or any other big-ticket item – it’s good to use the occasion to check yourself: How willing and ready am I to spend that same amount of money for God’s purposes?

Our honest answer will show us the condition of our heart, and how much room it has for Him. When it comes to the things of God, just like with the iPhone X, you’re looking for more capacity –you want to be the 256GB heart, not the 64GB one.

 

/ fiona@thir.st

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“I will take this secret to my grave”

by | 31 August 2017, 5:08 PM

Are you hoping you can take some of your secrets to the grave with you?

I have stuff from my childhood that I wanted to carry to my grave. I wonder how many other weary souls are now going through life struggling under the weight of their secret shame. It’s hard work – keeping up with a life of shadows and subterfuge. And there seems to be no way out.

The industry of shame thrives on things that we feel forced to keep hush-hush about. We get trapped in the illusion we try to project.

It doesn’t matter what the incident was, or how it trivial it may be when compared to other people’s experiences; shame is not sold by the gram. Shame is shame. And it hurts us all.

I remember one night when I said those words to myself; “I will take this to my grave.”

I’d been thinking of all the things I’d never told anyone about for so many years – things from my childhood.

I’d never dared to speak to anybody about those things before, but I had rehearsed it in my head countless times, imagined what it would be like to have someone listen with compassion and tell me that it’s okay now.

Why keep things secret? Because of fear – of being judged, of being deemed unworthy – and pride. What would people think of me if they found out?

This resolution kept me from love. Shame, the tyrant that it is, keeps you from reaching out, even though love is within reach.

Why keep things secret? Because of fear – of being judged, of being deemed unworthy – and pride. What would people think of me if they found out?

That night, I felt I was coming to the end of my rope. I needed another option.

And that’s when I thought about what Jesus said: “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” (John 10:10)

Because He has come, life is now an option. But I was still pacing around somewhere between death and life. I wasn’t dead – I’d chosen eternal life – but I wasn’t embracing the full life that Jesus offered.

But Jesus said that He has come, and I must leave my old life – everything about it – behind (2 Corinthians 5:17).

I must walk away from the grave. 

While I held my secrets close to me, I also longed for someone to tell me that it’s okay now – that I am still worthy of love.

“But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8)

Only God’s word has the power to declare if any of us is worthy of love; and He proved it, sending His son to the Cross, that in His death and resurrection we might have life. And You need to hear it from Him for yourselfShame’s grip on us is over (Romans 8:1). We stand uncondemned.

The love and power of God is the only antidote that can reverse the death-sting that is shame.

That night, I had to learn to put aside the shame that I had grown so accustomed to, and trade it in for love. To break out of the clutches of shame and its chorus of insults, I learnt I had to continually choose to listen to the voice that could break the curses. I needed to hear Him speak.

The love and power of God is the only antidote that can reverse the death-sting that is shame.

I called, He answered. And shame fled.

The next thing I had to do was to open my life up to people who could be trusted. It wasn’t the easiest nor the most instinctive thing for me to do – but I needed people around me – people who would display God’s love and remind me of the truth when I need it the most (2 Corinthians 6:11-13).

Several months later, I stood in the midst of a huge crowd at a Christian conference. And I will always remember the roar from the crowd when we sang this line:

“And as You speak, a hundred billion failures disappear”

The roar of voices and shouts of victory from the 20,000 others in the crowd reminded me that I have never been alone – not in my failures; and certainly not in my victory. Who else but God could pull off such a prison break? Who else could cancel our failures, drive away our shame and give us new life?

“And as You speak
A hundred billion failures disappear
Where You lost Your life so I could find it here
If You left the grave behind You

So will I
– So Will I (100 Billion X) by Hillsong United

Don’t bear your shame to your grave. He died so you don’t have to. Lay it on His. Then leave that grave behind.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Ah ma and the afterlife: My seventh-month thoughts

by | 29 August 2017, 6:21 PM

“Cannot swim today, it’s too late already, later the zhui gwee (‘water ghost’ in Hokkien) catch you ah.”

It was that time of the year again – the seventh month (七月) in the Chinese lunar calendar. I could argue that I needed the swimming practice, and I’d wear my arm floaties – but no one was going to out-talk ah ma. And certainly not a five-year-old child.

The beliefs that my grandparents held about the seventh month spilled into my early life, through swimming bans and cautions to avoid the makeshift altars left out by the roadside.

I remember watching my family members fold “hell money” before burning it in a small, red burner that sat outside the house.

“How are they going to get the money?” I remember asking as a six-year-old.

I joined in the festivities anyway. I liked seeing my family do things together, and I wanted to be a part of it, even if my tiny hands never did succeed at folding a paper ingot.

Not just me – it feels like there’s a generation gap in keeping up with the traditions.

The traditions of seventh month were embedded in my consciousness. But the annual activity ended when I moved out of my grandmother’s house.

Not just me – it feels like there’s a generation gap in keeping up with the traditions.

Most of us don’t oppose the rules in open defiance, whether out of fear of offending the spirits, or out of respect for those who do follow the tradition, depending on your beliefs.

I’m sure many of us in the younger generation still think twice about taking something from a makeshift altar by the pavement or taking the front row (said to be reserved for “special guests”) at a getai.

These days, I no longer participate in the traditions and rituals of the seventh month. You wouldn’t find me offering incense, though I would gladly sit out of a swimming session – out of respect – if someone from the older generation requests that I do.

I always wondered what this season says about what we believe about life after death.

If we burn paper money and houses for our relatives, does it mean we believe that the underworld is where they have gone? Is that also where they believed they were going?

The festival may not mean what it used to for me – but it gives pause for thought. It’s an opportunity for us to think about death before death comes.

There is a great big, confusing web of religion, folklore, science and superstition to make sense of. But at the heart is the profoundly simple question that even children ask: Where do we go after we die?

Is this lifetime all there is to the story? But then why does it feel like we were made for more?

This month, the country pauses to focus on death – honour for the departed, the horror of hell, the inevitability of the end. 

Some of us go in search of answers, while some of us prefer to find out only when the end comes. I fell somewhere in the middle of that continuum.

As a child, I wondered if I had a say in where I would go, and if it was dependent on more than just being a good person in this lifetime – because that sounded like a terribly tall order (1 John 1:8-10).

Many years later, I found my answer in the Bible. Jesus said that He has come to give us life, and it has been fully paid for – for anyone who would believe (John 3:16). 

I’d seen depictions of “heaven” in both American and local Chinese television shows, but I’d never heard it spoken about as a reality for my life until I read the Bible:

“My Father’s house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you?” (John 14:2)

This month, the country pauses to focus on death – honour for the departed, the horror of hell, the inevitability of the end. Don’t discount the possibility that hell isn’t all that could await.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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Food – it’s more than just something you eat

by | 28 August 2017, 12:48 PM

I’ll be honest. I haven’t been the most sincere thanksgiver-of-food.

I might say that I’m thankful for God and the food, and I might run a quick #DearGodthankyouforthefood in my head, but my gratitude was lacking.

The truth is, I didn’t value food enough to be thankful for it.

Sure, I love food, as my friends would attest, but only as a social and gastronomical experience. But I took it for granted that food would always be on my table.

Which meant I used to skip my meals a lot. I would skip meals simply because I was too lazy to prepare food, and too picky to settle for “just anything that would fill my stomach”.

The result? I end up on my power-saving mode – like my iPhone – where I have enough juice to stay switched on, but not enough to do anything worthwhile, without a risk of fizzling out.

If I feel more secure when my phone’s battery level is above 70%, shouldn’t I watch my own energy level with as much fervour? (I can almost hear my mom saying “I told you so.”)

Our giving-of-thanks with each meal reminds us to look to God every opportunity we get (Psalm 34:1), even in things that feel mundane. Gratitude towards God injects wonder back into our soul that so easily goes on autopilot – which is not a good mode. We’re supposed to be intentional about the discipleship process.

When we’re attuned with God, we are conscious of God in our daily dealings.

Go back to Primary School science. You remember plants and photosynthesis? Plants convert light energy into chemical energy. That’s their food, to help them do their thing as plants – grow deeper roots, bear more fruit.

That’s us, too. Food is about having the energy to not just survive, but to grow deeper roots – love God – and bear more fruit – love your neighbour.

We need energy to contend for our faith.

Food is about having the energy to not just survive, but to grow deeper roots – love God – and bear more fruit – love your neighbour.

We need energy to work with all our heart, to pray when we don’t feel like it, to love when it’s inconvenient, to worship when we’re weak, to intercede when we’re limited, to rejoice when every fibre of our being says otherwise, to hope when bleakness tries to befriend us, to resist the devil, to guard our hearts.

It may seem pretty obvious to you, but it took a loving nudge from God to remind me that if I am to do all that, I have to make sure my body is ready for the battle ahead. In my case, that means bothering to have my meals consistently!

I didn’t want to be caught in a situation where I’m too physically weak to help someone in need or too lethargic to intercede in prayer.

So even as we pray for divine strength from God, it’s worthwhile to consider if we have been mindful to take care of our diets – from which we obtain physical strength – such that we’re doing our best to be good stewards of our health and resources.

I don’t know about you, but I’m running hard for the finish line. I’m giving it everything I’ve got. No sloppy living for me! I’m staying alert and in top condition. (1 Corinthians 9:26, MSG)

So, my grace these days goes something like this: “Thank you God for giving me the food I have in front of me now, and in such abundance. As I gain strength from this meal, remind me and help me to love You more and to serve Your people better today.”

How does yours go?

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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The unusual mammogram

by Bee Lian Chng | 25 August 2017, 4:08 PM

I’m not the kind to keep up with health screenings, but I went for a mammogram anyway – something told me I had to. When my results came back from the lab, my veteran GP confirmed from her experience that it was cancer.

It was likely that I would have to have my right breast removed.

My first instinct was to rush to a private hospital and go for surgery immediately. As soon as possible. I had always believed that it was important for me to make and save enough money for medical emergencies like this – so I could get treated at a private hospital.

But when my doctor asked if I wanted to go to a private or public hospital to follow up with a specialist, God prompted me to go to a public hospital. So I obeyed and opted to go to one close to my home.

My GP referred me to a specialist at the Changi General Hospital; my appointment was set for two weeks later.

How would you spend those 14 days? For me, they were nothing like you would expect – it was nothing like what I had expected.

I experienced peace; and it wasn’t shallow, or transient. It was peace that was deep enough to envelope my weary heart and keep it afloat. It was also weighty and comforting; it was peace like I had never experienced before in all 50 years of my life. 

A waiting room isn’t the place we usually expect to find peace, but there I found peace.

Caught between unexpected bad news and uncertainty, I spent those 14 days in deep and quiet devotion with God. He taught me what it meant to move together with Him, even in the face of cancer. And I learnt to trust the one who always has my best intentions at heart.

I was not going to let go of God, not even in the face of a mastectomy.

At the hospital, another mammogram was conducted by a senior technician. She confirmed that they found something in my right breast and I was sent for an ultrasound scan next.

Over the next few hours, they ordered more checks and scans for me.

During the last two rounds of ultrasound scans, I fell asleep, despite the discomfort. In my sleep, I saw a dark, shadowy figure standing on the left side of my ultrasound table. The figure spoke to me:

“If the fig tree does not bud and there are no grapes on the vines;
If the olive crop fails and the fields produce no food;
If there are no sheep in the pen and no cattle in the stalls;
Will you still rejoice in the Lord? Will you still be joyful in God your Saviour?”

Without hesitation, I answered him, without a sliver of doubt in my heart: “Yes, I will still rejoice and be joyful in the Lord my God.”

Upon my answer, the dark figure vanished.

The next moment, I saw a bright light and I heard a voice asking me if I would allow Him to take away a part of my body. I knew that it was God speaking to me. At this point, I thought it meant He would help me through the mastectomy, the removal of the breast.

Again, without hesitation, I told Him that He could take away whatever He wanted.

He was an even greater, more merciful God than I could have imagined.

My answers were coming from the deepest part of my heart – the part that is tested when confusing and painful things happen. I was not going to let go of God, not even in the face of a mastectomy.

Right after I answered, the ultrasound technician woke me up and I headed back into the waiting room for the final results.

When I sat down before the doctor, he told me: “Congratulations.”

In the final few rounds of scanning, they couldn’t find the lumps that had been detected previously. I didn’t even need a biopsy, or a follow-up review. The doctor stamped the word DISCHARGED on my appointment card … and that was it!

It only became clear to me then that when God had asked to take away something from me, He was referring to the cancer in my body, and not the mastectomy that I had already mentally prepared myself for.

He was an even greater, more merciful God than I could have imagined.

We question God’s faithfulness to us when bad things happen in our lives. But I wonder how many of us are able to stand firm when our faithfulness to Him comes to question.

I left the waiting room with my cancer healed – grace for today – and my faith intact. My bright hope for tomorrow.

Some time after my brush with cancer, as I studied the book of Habakkuk, I came upon a very familiar passage. I’d never read it before.

“Though the fig tree does not bud and there are no grapes on the vines,
though the olive crop fails and the fields produce no food,
though there are no sheep in the pen and no cattle in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
I will be joyful in God my Saviour.”

(Habbakuk 3:17-18)

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Why I stopped doing yoga

by | 22 August 2017, 12:31 PM

I’ve got a bad neck and a troublesome lower-back injury, so I’ve tried to prioritise regular stretching and exercise.

This time last year, I tried both yoga and pilates in an attempt to help me get into a regular habit of proper, real stretching. My troublesome back calmed down a lot in those few months.

But I found that the mention of yoga raised some brows in the Christian circle.

I had to find out: When it comes to yoga, can we reap the physical benefit without the spiritual entanglements?

Can I do yoga if I am mindful to worship my God instead of other gods?

Yoga is an spiritual discipline rooted in other ancient religions – more here. It’s alive and well today, especially in mainstream Western culture. You can’t walk 5 minutes without seeing a yoga studio in Singapore.

It’s friendly and hip … but it’s still yoga. More than a physical exercise programme, the goal of yoga, which means to “join” in Sanskrit, is enlightenment and unity with the universe.

When it comes to yoga, can we reap the physical benefit without the spiritual entanglements?

In classes, the yoga practice begins with surya namaskara – sun salutations. The pose originated as a way for yoga practitioners to worship the sun god, Surya. So, all the poses were originally intended to do more than merely give relief for your aches.

When I first started my classes, my focus was entirely on trying to copy the instructor’s poses. But as I got more familiar with the poses, I realised that something was … off. As my spiritual senses “came back to me”, I realised what I was subjecting myself to: The worship of another god.

I realised my question on whether Christians can do yoga was a self-seeking question one – and it wasn’t the right question. We can do anything we want. But should we?

Walking out of class that day, this verse popped into my mind: Do not bow down before their gods or worship them or follow their practices.” (Exodus 23:24a)

I kept thinking about it, and asked myself the questions: Would I bow down at a physical altar that hosted other gods? If I do so, would “praying on the inside” and “meditating upon His word” make it any more acceptable?

No.

No one worships God by placing an offering (in this case, our body) on the altar of another god. If our intention is to worship our God, the One true God, then we cannot do it through the worship of other gods – which is what yoga is, no matter how it’s advertised as a fitness routine.

“Be very careful, then, how you live – not as unwise but as wise.” (Ephesians 5:15)

I learnt that if I desire to honour God, I must cease to worship anything else – even if I long for its other benefits, like yoga’s promise of relief for our aching bodies.

I have since stopped practicing yoga altogether. But to be honest, I have thought of going back. The temptation is real, especially with the lure of the beautiful, airy spaces a lot of hipster yoga studios use.

What helped was telling those around me about my decision to stop going for yoga classes. I had friends around me who knew that being friends mean helping to hold me to a higher standard.

Would I bow down at a physical altar that hosted other gods? Would “praying on the inside” and “meditating upon His word” make it any more acceptable?

There are realms – some more innocuous than others on the outside – that we have to navigate as believers. We cannot be successful if we try to do it without the Holy Spirit as our guide (John 14:26) and His Word as our weapon.

“Search me, God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” (Psalm 139:23-24)

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

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I’m not ready to meet you, God

by | 14 August 2017, 1:04 PM

“If the plane crashes, then we’ll just go to heaven earlier!”

We were about to board a plane to Sydney when my friend said it. We’d been talking about MH370 and other recent aviation tragedies. It was meant to be comforting, I’m sure, but I was disturbed.

I was not ready to meet God.

I haven’t achieved anything significant in my life! I haven’t found someone to grow old and happy with! Nor had any kids yet! And I still need to decorate my dream house with the books I’ve been stockpiling for my it’s-gonna-be-epic bookshelf!

My well-conditioned, well-drilled Christian brain immediately hit back: How could you even think that? Does not the joy of meeting God far surpass all these things?

While I had grown to love God’s presence, I couldn’t help but be fearful at the thought of actually meeting Him – coming face-to-face with the One who searches hearts and examines minds.

My instinctive thoughts were all the things I would miss out on if I were to die anytime soon. But in that split second in which my innermost thoughts surfaced, I learnt something about my heart and its true treasures: I was choosing the things of the world over the God I professed to love.

I was still holding on to the worldly notions of what would bring happiness that I’ve had since I was a child, way before I met Jesus.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with kids, marriage and beautiful bookshelves. They aren’t the problem.

The problem comes when we prize these gifts above the One who gives them (James 1:17).

What I learnt before that flight was that God wasn’t my only treasure. I had not captured in my heart the surpassing worth of knowing Christ (Philippians 3:8). I was settling for the world.

In reflection, I thought about the sweet moments in my life when God had surprised me with His presence:

  • I was strolling home on a beautiful day. Nothing seemed terribly ordinary, when I suddenly felt His smile upon me. My heart leapt for joy.
  • I opened my Bible in a hurry to get a passage in, before I headed out for the day. I didn’t expect much, but the Spirit opened my imagination, giving me backstage-access to the unfolding drama at the Red Sea.
  • When my heart was burdened and heavy with darkness, He said that He would show me a new way to live: In the lightness of freedom, and in company with Him.

But at the same time, I was afraid of meeting God face-to-face.

I haven’t become the person God would be pleased with. I have so many more things about myself that I need to change; I need more time.

That was how I felt – why I wasn’t ready to meet God. While I had grown to love God’s presence, I couldn’t help but be fearful at the thought of actually meeting Him (Romans 14:12) – coming face-to-face with the One who searches hearts and examines minds (Jeremiah 17:10).

The comfort I have is that, as I grow to be more like Him, He will see the good work He has started in me all the way through to completion.

I was too focused on the truth about Romans 3:23, that as a sinner, I should have no business being in the presence of a Holy God. In my self-loathing, I’d forgotten the truth that follows in Romans 3:24: That all are justified freely by His grace, through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.

When we think about the sinfulness of our heart and the mistakes we still make, we’re ashamed to enter into God’s light. But the truth is that we only have to be afraid if pleasing God is not our priority.

This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God. (John 3:19-21)

God knows who we are – sinners, redeemed by His grace. We have an assurance that when we choose to draw near to Him and live in His light, there’s forgiveness instead of shame. There’s grace instead of condemnation. There’s eternal freedom.

All great dichotomies, none of which make sense. And yet we have them. That’s grace!

The comfort I have is that, as I grow to be more like Him, He will see the good work He has started in me all the way through to completion. So that when I finally meet Him, I will not be afraid, but satisfied.

As for me, I will be vindicated and will see your face;
When I awake, I will be satisfied with seeing your likeness. (Psalm 17:15)

Moments later, the engines in the wings of the plane roared to life. I took to the air — a little closer to God.

/ fiona@thir.st

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I live to fight another day: Reflections on Dunkirk

by | 11 August 2017, 1:50 PM

Sometimes, after a movie, I find myself walking out of the cinema feeling the same way I leave church services on good days.

I got this same feeling again when I saw Dunkirk. Nolan’s latest masterpiece centres on the desperate struggle of Allied soldiers against the German advance at Dunkirk.

Their only hope lies in a mass evacuation from France’s beaches – so they can live to fight another day.

I saw myself reflected in the faces of the defeated soldiers.

It’s been a difficult year for me. I’ve been struggling with my self-worth. I’ve asked myself endlessly: “Who am I?”

I’d been going to church, worshipping Father God for almost a decade – yet I didn’t really feel like I was His child. My identity remain centred on the things I did and the roles I played.

I knew that He loved me, but I felt like I wasn’t enough.

I still wasn’t as pretty as her. I wasn’t as talented as him. I felt I had to prove myself: Be more driven in life, have a better heart, say the right things …

There was no end to this performance treadmill. I could never get off. It was a losing battle from the start, because at the core of my being, I didn’t believe that I was loved.

The bitterness of feeling unworthy ate away at my heart, a potent mix of pride and shame.

Like the dying soldiers on the coast of Dunkirk, I needed to be rescued. I needed a saviour.

But I believed I was beyond God’s reach – too unworthy.

What I hadn’t realised was that that wasn’t an obstacle to God’s love – that is precisely the point of His love. I am entirely unworthy. And yet God in His grace reached out to me in love.

I had been fighting my own battles for a long time. At some point I was barely surviving, and in turn I started dying. At the lowest point in my walk, I heard God’s voice again.

I came to the end of myself, with nowhere left to go.

Ashamed of my sin and rebellious heart, I broke down before the Lord and asked for forgiveness.

I felt like the soldier in Dunkirk who boarded the train headed home, embarrassed at having to be evacuated from the front line, fully expecting to be met with ridicule by his countrymen.

Instead he met an blind old man who was handing out blankets to the rescued soldiers at the train station.

“Well done, lads. Well done.”
“All we did is survive … ”
“That’s enough.”

The soldier was humbled at the old man’s gesture of kindness; it all felt so undeserved, I imagine. Which was exactly how I felt when God quietly said to me:

没事, 回来就好. It’s okay, you’re home now.

I imagine that when God says “it’s okay”, he’s not just saying it. I mean, He’s God – His word is life and truth. I see Him saying it as He raises His mighty hand, lifting the crushing weight of all that weighed us down.

Then I see His other hand, reaching out to us.

“When I called, you answered me; you greatly emboldened me.” (Psalm 138:3)

In my weakness, God gave me strength. He led me through the fog of confusion as we sorted out my life.

God spoke to my heart, and told me that He loves me. I had always known it in my mind, but He said it again for my heart.

My spirit surged in response to it. I was alive again. His voice dispelled all my fears. It quenched the flaming arrows which had kept me down for so long.

He helped me recall who I was in Him. I put on the armour and took up my sword (Ephesians 6:14-17). I knew how to fight again.

But Dunkirk was one episode in a long war. We may feel safe now, but we must expect other blows to be struck.

In response to the evacuation at Dunkirk, Churchill said: “Our thankfulness at the escape of our Army must not blind us to the fact that what has happened in France and Belgium is a colossal military disaster.

“And we must expect another blow to be struck almost immediately at us or at France.”

Soldiers on the front lines, deep in battle, won’t know when victory is theirs – all they know is that they have to fight for as long as they’re told to.

As Christians, we are in that unique position. We know that at the end, we win – Jesus will return. But for now, this is wartime – we have to stay alert (1 Peter 5:8).

We live to fight another day.

/ fiona@thir.st

Fiona is secretly hilarious and one of her dogs thinks so too. She loves a good chat with strangers, store assistants, and fluffy dogs.

Conversations

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