Faith

“My contentment is not in miracles”: Bethel’s Chris Gore on disabilities and disappointments

Chris Gore, Director of Healing Ministries at Bethel Church // November 14, 2019, 3:01 pm

Chris Gore 3

I have a severely disabled daughter. She’s physically and mentally disabled, and in a wheelchair. But how I deal with that disappointment is to make sure that I don’t get offended at God.

If we lead our lives without dealing with our disappointments, what happens is that we end up being offended at God. And we start blaming God for something that was not from Him.

The Bible clearly says in the book of John, that the enemy comes to kill, steal and destroy, but Jesus comes to give life and to give it abundantly (John 10:10).

Sickness is not from God. God didn’t send sickness to teach us a lesson. He sent Jesus Christ to teach sickness a lesson. And we all have opportunities in our life to deal with disappointments because even Jesus himself had disappointments.

How do I get past my disappointments and hurts from church?

We see this in Matthew 14, where Jesus received the news that John the Baptist had been beheaded.

You can’t tell me that Jesus wasn’t disappointed, because Jesus and John grew up with each other. So there was obviously a relationship there. And what we see is that Jesus went up the mountain to be alone with the Father (Matthew 14:23).

I wonder what did Jesus remind Himself of when He was with the Father? Was He blaming the Father? Was He upset? Or was He coming into that place of remembering and reminding Himself of the goodness and the graciousness and the love of the Father?

How we deal with disappointments in our life today determines the fruit or the outcome of our walk tomorrow. 

I don’t worship the day of miracles, I worship the God of miracles.

Jesus dealt with that disappointment. The Bible tells us that when Jesus came down from his solitary place after being alone with the Father, everyone without exception that came to him was healed (Matthew 14:35).

I too live in the tension – and many of us do – but the absence of the miracle doesn’t define the nature of God.

I don’t worship the day of miracles, I worship the God of miracles. So when the miracle doesn’t come, my contentment is not in the miracle, my contentment is in Jesus.

Have I seen my daughter healed yet? No. Do I see special needs kids healed? Yes, all the time. 

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A common question that I get today is whether miracles can still happen or whether miracles do happen. I used to have that doubt as well. And really, what we’ve done there is to lower the Word of God to our experience which we then live out from.

But we need to make sure that we’re living to the standard that Jesus said without pulling the Gospel down to our level of experience. We need to begin to lift our experience to the Word of God and what the Gospel says.

Miracles still happen today. There’s hardly a day that goes by that I don’t see a miracle in one form or another, and it’s spreading around the world. This is the most exciting time that we could possibly be alive.

THINK + TALK

  1. Do you think miracles exist today? Why?
  2. Have you experienced a miracle before? What took place?
  3. Is there a disappointment in your life that you need to deal with today? What kind of fruit do you want to walk in tomorrow?